KLRD logo with mission statement

Google:
Twitter Logo in Blue Facebook Logo
Policy Areas
Publications
Committees
About Us

Dashboard Help Topics

Please direct general inquiries to kslegres@klrd.ks.gov

Jump to:

Basic Navigation

  • Use the main KLRD navigation bar tabs to navigate away from the Expenditures dashboard to other main KLRD pages.
  • Use the Budget Navigation Bar (the lower, dark gray navigation bar) to navigate within the dashboard to find links, filters, a glossary of select budget terms, and agency information.
  • Use the Tableau Navigation Bar at the bottom of the dashboard to share content, download images or data, and toggle full-screen display of the dashboard.

Overview of Dashboard Content and Layout

The dashboard is split into two main columns, each containing two frames.

  • In the left column, the top frame (Overview ) provides an overview and basic comparison of selected budgets.
  • The bottom frame of the left column (Trends ) shows trends in actual expenditures for the ten most recent years of data.
  • The right column provides details for a particular budget version (e.g. Approved) and fiscal year. The two frames of the right column provide pie (Pie Chart) and bar (Bar Chart) charts that allow the data to be categorized in various ways.
  • Selecting a Budget Version

    • A budget version and year for which data should be displayed in the right column can be selected by clicking one of the data points in the Overview scatter plot.

Functionality and Interactivity

Tooltips (hover-over content)

  • Hover over any item (data point, pie segment, etc.) on the dashboard to reveal a tooltip containing additional details about the data.

Parameter Selection

Each dashboard frame has a choice of parameters that allow the information to be displayed in different ways. These parameters may be changed independently of one another, allowing the user to explore budget data from a variety of perspectives.

  • The budget selection parameter in the Overview frame allows the user to select budgets to compare (selecting one of the Overview budget data points will also select that budget version and fiscal year to be displayed in the Pie Chart and Bar Chart frames).
  • Each of the remaining frames (Trends, Pie Chart, and Bar Chart) provides a list of parameters to choose from that allow for different categorizations of expenditure data.
    • By default, the Trends frame shows the trend in State General Fund vs. All Other Funds actual expenditures, while the Pie Chart shows a breakdown of expenditures for each function of government, and the Bar Chart categorizes expenditures according to the major purpose for which funds are spent.

Dynamic content filtering

  • Dashboard frames interact to allow the user to filter the view based on selecting content in the frame. Selecting content in either the Pie Chart or Bar Chart filters the data shown throughout the dashboard based on the selection.
  • For example, clicking on the "Education" function of government sector in the Pie Chart will limit expendtitures to those agencies with an educational function for all other dashboard content; clicking on the "Capital Improvements" bar in the Bar Chart will limit expendtitures in other frames to expenditures used to make capital improvements.

Quick Filters menu

  • In addition to the interactive filters on the dashboard itself, the Quick Filters tab in the Budget Navigation Bar allows the user to quickly restrict all of the data displayed in the dashboard.
  • Selecting the Quick Filters tab opens a sidebar menu allowing the user to filter the view by Agency or Function of Government. These may be combined with additional filters for funding, major purpose, and expenditure category that can further restrict the view.
  • Combining Quick Filters permits views to be restricted in multiple ways at the same time, for example , only State General Fund expenditures on Salaries and Wages for a particular agency, program, or function of government.

Clearing applied filters

  • To clear a filter that has been applied by selecting an element in the dashboard (e.g. a section of the pie chart), simply click on the selected element a second time to de-select it.
  • To clear Quick Filter selections, select an appropriate dropdown category (e.g. select "All Funds" to clear filtering by "State General Fund"), or check "All" at the top of the Quick Filter menu to clear any existing filters and show all data.
  • Alternatively, reload the dashboard by clicking the page refresh button in your browser window.

Additional features

  • The Quick Links tab of the Budget Navigation Menu provides links to useful budget information resources.
  • The Glossary tab provides a list of definitions for select budget terminology.
  • The Agency Info tab allows the user to select an agency from a dropdown menu to see certain basic information for that agency.
  • To view the dashboard in fullscreen mode, click on the fullscreen button in the Tableau menu bar at the bottom of the dashboard.

Sharing Dashboard Views

  • Share the dashboard by clicking the three connected dots icon at the bottom of the page in the Tableau menu bar. This will bring up a dialog box with a link that may be copied or shared via email or by social media.
    • To share by email, click the email icon (envelope) to open an email with a link to the dashboard.
    • To share by social media, click the Facebook or Twitter icon and follow the prompts.

Sharing the current view

  • If filters are applied, or the dashboard otherwise differs from the default view, you can share the current view by selecting the "Current View" option. "Original View" will provide a link to share the default version of the dashboard.

Exporting Images and Data

To export an image or dashboard data, click on the download icon in the Tableau menu bar at the bottom of the dashboard and follow the prompts.

Troubleshooting Common Problems

Problem: I don't see any data.

  • Why is this happening? Data for current selections do not exist. This may be due to the following:
    • A budget version and year needs to be specified. How to fix this issue: select a budget version by clicking one of the data points in the Overview scatter plot.
    • Currently applied filters filter out all possible data for the current view. For example ?, the State General Fund only quick filter has been applied for an agency that does not have any ependitures from the State General Fund. How to fix this issue: clear any filters that could be causing the problem, or reload the dashboard by refreshing the page in your browser window.

Problem: I'm receiving the following error: "Uncaught SecurityError: Failed to read the 'sessionStorage' property from 'Window': Access is denied for this document."

  • Why is this happening? Applications using Tableau require the use of certain cookies to function as intended.
    • To fix the issue, enable third-party cookies or try a different browser, such as Firefox.

Problem: I don't see the dashboard (charts and/or tables). There's a top KLRD banner for navigation, but the dashboard isn't loading.

  • This could happen for a few reasons:
    1. You're trying to use the web version on a mobile phone - use the link to the mobile-friendly version instead (go to Quick Links > Go To Mobile Version).
    2. Your browser settings don't permit JavaScript, which the dashboard requires. Enable JavaScript in your browser settings.
    3. Your cookie settings could be preventing loading - enable third-party cookies. In some browsers you may only need to allow/enable cookies for https://public.tableau.com and https://www.tableau.com

Performance Based Budget Information

Please direct general inquiries to kslegres@klrd.ks.gov

Use the Quick Filters tab to filter information by agency/program and function of government.

Jump to function of government:
Jump to agency:

AGRICULTURE

AGRICULTURE

Kansas Department of Agriculture

_

Administrative Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Administrative Services program within KDA houses all of the support functions of the agency, as well as the Office of the Secretary. Without these integral functions, such as Fiscal, Human Resources, Information Technology (IT), Legal, and Communication, the agency would cease to function. Proper guidance and oversight for the entire agency is provided at this level and communicated to employees, stakeholders, and interested parties. Should this program not be funded, these duties would statutorily be required to be assumed by other state agencies or state employees. A large degree of synergism, education, and experience would be lost, as well as goodwill with the agricultural industry as a whole. The agency would jeopardize their ability to compete and receive top federal grant awards, causing further negative consequences to the agency.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA Chapter 74 Article 5 KSA 74-569 - Organization of the Department of Agriculture KSA 74-576 - Powers and duties of the Secretary of Agriculture Discretionary No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide timely, accurate, and efficient fiscal services (accounts payable and accounts receivable)

B. Provide comprehensive Human Resources services to KDA employees and future KDA employees

C. Assist programs in the modernization of legacy IT services and continue to improve existing services

D. Provide timely, accurate, and efficient legal services (process administrative enforcement orders and settlement agreements)

E. Provide open records to the public in a timely manner

F. Advocate for agriculture and KDA programs through traditional and other media

Program History

The Kansas Department of Agriculture (KDA) is the nation's first department of agriculture, devoted to the total support of agriculture in Kansas. Crafted from the roots of the Kansas Agriculture Society and Kansas State Agricultural Society, dating back to 1855 and 1862, respectively, the State Board of Agriculture was officially created by the Kansas Legislature in 1872. It was not until 1994 that the Board was officially renamed the Kansas Department of Agriculture. In 2014, a majority of the department was relocated from Topeka to the current headquarters' location in Manhattan.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of full-time employees retained B 90% 82% 83% 83% 81% 80% 80%
2. Average number of processing days for orders in Legal D 40 29 19 19 21 18 18
3. IT user satisfaction rating C 95% 94% 96% 96% 96% 96% 96%
4. Number of orders issued by Legal for all programs D 908 409 451 500 482 500 500
5. Number of vouchers per staff member A 1,035 1,097 1,313 1,250 1,329 1,337 1,337
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
6. Number of IT Service Desk requests resolved C 2,678 2,751 2,787 2,800 2,684 2,800 2,900
7. Number of news releases F 89 78 60 70 65 60 60
8. Number of open record requests processed E 1,019 1,092 981 1,000 1,095 1,100 1,100
9. Number of settlement conferences held D 98 67 79 85 85 85 85
10. Number of vouchers processed in SMART A 4,659 4,388 5,253 5,000 5,319 5,350 5,350

_

Ag Marketing


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Consequences of not funding this program include: failure to meet statutory obligations as outlined below; loss of a voice for and support staff hired and trained to validate, promote and mentor/grow/expand Kansas agriculture (farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses/Ag Growth Strategy) domestically and internationally all while also serving a supply chain network associated with the direct, indirect and induced effects of the industry; loss of management oversight for the current KDA/Kansas Value Added Foods & Meat Laboratory partnerships designed to provide discounted services to Kansas food, beverage and meat processing/value add entities; dissolution of the state trademark program - From the Land of Kansas - and marketing initiatives/benefits (including eCommerce) offered through the program for farmers' markets and small/mid-sized food and agriculture entities; loss of securing and administering Federal funding associated with USDA AMS grants and USDA FAS market access/market development (International/federal cooperator partnerships); loss of agency economics and statistics validating the Kansas agriculture industry and data collection by statisticians contributing to feeder cattle indexes and hay/sunflower market pricing reports published by USDA AMS; loss of state/domestic agricultural advocacy initiatives including support for and engagement with secondary and post-secondary classrooms/audiences.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
ERO #40 (2011) KSA 74-5, 112-5, 118 - establishing agriculture marketing and promotions within KDA. Agriculture products (1996) KSA 74-50, 156-50, 163 - product development, value added center, trademark registration, contract fulfillment. Farmers' Market (2013) KSA 2-3801-3804 - farmers' market definition, registration, liability protection. Fostering Development and Economic Welfare of Agriculture Industry KSA 74-576 KSA 74-504 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Serve all Kansans through innovate programming and delivering solutions designed to create an environment that facilitates growth and expansion in agriculture while increasing pride in and awareness of the state's largest industry - agriculture

B. Increase the awareness of making Kansas a potential state for the relocation or expansion of agriculture business

C. Increase and enhance export opportunities for Kansas farmers, ranchers, and agribusinesses

Program History

The Division of Agriculture Marketing, Advocacy and Outreach was originally created in the Board of Agriculture but was transferred to the Department of Commerce in 1995. In 2011, the division was transferred into the Department of Agriculture. The Division is organized into the following programs: Agriculture Workforce Development, Domestic Market Development, Compliance Education and Agency Outreach/Advocacy, Economist and Statistics, International Market Development and From the Land of Kansas/Affiliated Programs (local foods and farmers' markets). Additionally, the division has a 12-member Agriculture Marketing, Promotions and Advisory Board that meets quarterly and serves as a citizen sounding board for program activities.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Implant / State & County Contributions, in billions of dollars A $49.20 $47.30 $53.40 $51.50 $57 $52.50 $55
2. International Market Development / Total Agricultural Trade Value in billions of dollars C $3.80 $4 $5.30 $4.50 $5.50 $4 $3.80
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. From the Land of Kansas Membership A 349 333 340 350 424 450 470
4. Implant/State and County Contributions (billions) (new measure) - $49.20 $47.30 $53.40 $0 $57 $52.50 $55
5. Strategic Growth Initiative (SGI) Community Facilitations B 2 1 3 5 4 7 8
6. Total value of agriculture trade in billions of dollars (new measure) - $3.80 $4 $4.10 $0 $5.50 $4 $3.80
7. Total Sales Generated from FLOK E-Commerce Member Marketing Initiatives A $62,309 $70,633 $74,634 $68,000 $56,604 $58,000 $60,000
8. Community Outreach Sessions for ABD Strategic Growth Initiatives (new measure) - 2 1 3 0 4 7 8
9. Total members from the Land of Kansas (new measure) - 349 333 340 0 424 450 470
10. Total Sales from FLOK E-Commerce (new measure) - $62,309 $70,633 $74,634 $0 $56,604 $58,000 $60,000

_

Animal Health


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Funding sources are a combination of SGF, license and registration fees, USDA APHIS cooperative agreements, NADPRP farm bill funding, special program grants. Both farm bill funds and special program grants are project specific and provide opportunities for additional initiatives.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Animal Health KSA 47-104 through 47-2306 Stock running at large, strays, marks and brands, protection of domestic animals, registration of veterinarians, public livestock markets, deliveries in motor vehicles, disposal of dead animals, garbage restrictions, feedlots, pet animals, aquaculture, domesticated deer Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Support division responsibilities, including disease investigation and response and maintain interaction with regulated industries and stakeholders

B. Enhance internal communication and professional development

C. Enhance animal disease emergency response capabilities

Program History

Kansas Department of Animal Health became a stand alone agency in 1969 by combining the Livestock Sanitary Commission and the State Brand Commission. Via a Governor's reorganization order, the Kansas Animal Health Department became a division of the Kansas Department of Agriculture in July 1, 2011. It is now know as the Kansas Division of Animal Health. Currently there are three programs that make up the Division - Animal Disease Control, Animal Facilities Inspection, Brands Program - all of which work to ensure the health and welfare of Kansas livestock and domestic animals.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Conduct and develop at least one emergency management exercise and participate in one non-KDA sponsored exercise or tabletop event per year C 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
2. Conduct routine inspections of licensed facilities as outlined in statutes, regulations and internal policies, as well as conduct pet animal complaint inspections within 3 days (72-hours) A 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
3. Respond to Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) FAD investigation requests within a four-hour timeframe of report A, C 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
4. Utilize all available funds that are provided from USDA and DHS in a responsible and effective manner, in line with approved workplan A, C 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Number of Avian Influenza tests by state staff A 1,707 3,490 1,220 1,500 1,320 1,000 1,000
6. Number of Certificate of Veterinary Inspections (CVI) A, C 51,614 51,110 62,432 62,000 65,894 65,000 65,000
7. Number of facility inspections A 1,531 1,610 679 700 No Longer Used No Longer Used No Longer Used
8. Number of Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) investigations A, C 99 229 58 200 83 80 80
9. Number of Official Calfhood vaccinations A 169,000 175,000 162,524 160,000 147,569 145,000 135,000
10. Number of AFI facility inspections (new measure) - - - - 0 853 850 850

_

Conservation


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Lack of funding for Division of Conservation programs would lead to greater soil erosion and loss of agricultural production which negatively impacts the Kansas economy, greater sediment and nutrient loading to streams and lakes which increases water treatment costs for municipalities and reduces water storage capacity, greater damage to crops, roads and structures caused by increased flooding, and the loss of 100+ full time positions with Conservation District staff across Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Conservation Districts Law - 1937 KSA 2-1901 to 2-1918 Conservation of soil and water, prevention of soil erosion, flood control, preservation of wildlife, protection of public lands Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Provide support for conservation districts

B. Increase in efficiency and effectiveness of State Water Plan program implementation / administration

C. Implement the State Water Plan and 50-Year Water Vision by addressing priority resource concerns through increase local technical assistance and targeted conservation practices with special initiatives and partnerships / cooperative grants / agreements

Program History

The Division of Conservation, working with 105 local Conservation Districts, 75 organized Watershed Districts, other special-purpose districts, as well as state and federal entities administer programs to improve water quality, reduce soil erosion, conserve water, reduce flood potential and provide local water supply. The DOC has the responsibility to administer the Conservation Districts Law, the Watershed District Act and other statutes authorizing various programs.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Conserve and Extend the High Plains Aquifer by retiring water rights with CREP and WaterTAP Programs (irrigated acres retired) C 0 275 420 1,500 148 1,500 2,000
2. Effectively implement conservation practices on private lands by offering cost-share for agricultural best management practices statewide (tons of soil saved) C 113,575 82,410 164,286 165,000 236,963 250,000 260,000
3. Effectively provide technical assistance to implement conservation practices on private land by completing agreements to sponsor Conservation Technical Assistance contracts with Conservation Districts (number of contracts) B 36 40 40 38 40 44 55
4. Improve the State's Water Quality by targeting conservation efforts to high priority areas (acres protected in high priority areas) C 43,156 33,313 40,154 45,000 39,435 42,000 45,000
5. Reduce our Vulnerability to Extreme Events by improving soil health through providing education and information (number of producers attending soil health workshops) C 927 1,260 3,000 3,500 2,670 3,000 3,200
6. Secure, Protect and Restore our Kansas Reservoirs by implementing Streambank Stabilization Projects to reduce Reservoir Sedimentation (tons of soil reduced) B 35,969 50,539 40,233 30,015 19,810 27,500 55,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
7. Conserve and Extend the High Plains Aquifer by retiring water rights (dollars spent on CREP and WaterTAP Programs) A, C 0 24,861 227,870 431,029 74,726 1,189,574 1,554,142
8. Effectively implement conservation practices on private lands by offering cost-share for agricultural best management practices statewide (dollars spent in Water Resources and Non-Point Source programs) B $3,639,427 $2,938,031 $2,002,429 $5,895,946 $2,804,610 $3,200,000 $3,300,000
9. Effectively provide technical assistance to implement conservation practices on private land by completing agreements to sponsor Conservation Technical Assistance contracts with Conservation Districts (federal funding leveraged) A 1,017,120 1,366,281 1,430,564 1,459,265 1,142,090 1,250,000 1,750,000
10. Improve the State's Water Quality by targeting conservation efforts to high priority areas (dollars spent in high priority areas) B 1,730,080 1,161,121 2,301,311 2,400,000 2,799,610 3,000,000 3,100,000
11. Reduce our Vulnerability to Extreme Events by improving soil health through providing education and information (dollars spent on soil health) B 54,509 110,144 625,344 650,000 884,645 1,000,000 1,100,000
12. Secure, Protect and Restore our Kansas Reservoirs by implementing Streambank Stabilization Projects to reduce Reservoir Sedimentation (dollars spent on Streambank Stabilization) B 521,841 1,112,829 1,531,826 1,084,589 1,084,589 750,000 1,500,000

_

Dairy & Feed Safety


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Inspections and sampling would not be performed, increasing risk of milk product and commercial feed contamination, and/or adulteration putting public health and animal health at risk. Illness and death could result. Kansas milk and dairy products could not be shipped or sold in interstate commerce. Kansas feed manufacturers would not comply with FSMA requirements and could not export feed stuffs.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Dairy Law KSA 65-771 through 65-791 - licensing, inspection, and regulation of dairies and milk. Commercial Feeding Stuffs (1923) KSA 2-1001 et. seq. - require regulation and analysis of feed stuffs. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide a fair-minded regulatory environment for the Kansas dairy and commercial feed industry which results in safe, clean, unadulterated milk, dairy, and commercial feed products for both animal and human feed consumers

B. Achieve and maintain compliance with FDA guidelines and National standards

C. Grain program efficiencies by continuing to automate and streamline inspection, sampling, and record-keeping processes

Program History

The Dairy division within the old Board of Agriculture was established in 1925 within that same year the diary law was transferred to the State Board of Agriculture. The Dairy Inspection program protects consumers in Kansas and other states. Inspectors regulate the dairy industry starting at the farm and continuing as the milk and milk products are transported, process, distributed and sold. The Feed Inspection program safeguards both human and animal health by inspecting feed manufacturers, transporters, distributors/retailers and animal production facilities to ensure compliance with state and federal regulations.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percentage of FDA required dairy state surveys completed each fiscal year C 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
2. Percentage of passing dairy farm raw milk samples compared to total amount of samples analyzed each fiscal year A 96% 96% 96% 96% 95% 95% 95%
3. Percentage of passing feed samples vs. deficient samples each fiscal year B 84% 82% 80% 84% 93% 93% 93%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Total amount of state inspections (evaluations, tanker inspections, feed sample inspections, sampler evaluations) completed by both diary and feed programs each fiscal year A 1,927 1,856 2,111 2,100 1,627 1,700 1,700
5. Total FDA-related inspections completed, as specified in Goal B B 198 203 177 175 154 154 154

_

Food Safety


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Providing uniform food safety inspections in food establishments and food processing plants ensures a safe food supply to Kansas consumers. Failure to provide these inspections and regulate these food and lodging facilities under standard federal guidelines would significantly increase the risk of the consuming public and be detrimental to public health including possible death due to unsanitary food preparation conditions.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Transfer from KDHE to KDA (2004) KSA 74-581 Transfer from KDHE to KDA (2008) 74-5, 104 Food (1927) KSA 65-643 et seq. - licensing and inspecting food establishments and food processing plants. Lodging (1975) KSA 36-501 et seq. - licensing and inspection of lodging facilities ensuring minimum standards for safe and sanitary operation Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide uniform, effective, and efficient food safety inspections in order to protect public health and maintain the public's confidence in Kansas establishments

B. Professional development of Food Safety & Lodging program staff

C. Maintain outreach to customers through training and educational meetings

Program History

Food inspection regulation dates back to the early 1900s and traditionally under KDHE. In 2003, the Legislative Division of Post Audit studied Kansas' food inspections and as a result, food inspection was moved to the Department of Agriculture in 2004 with lodging inspections following in 2008. This was done to place all food regulation under Department of Agriculture which was already doing meat, poultry, dairy, and egg inspections. A number of efficiencies were gained and continues to present.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of individual employees completing training plans, yearly B 64% 64% 64% 64% 100% 100% 100%
2. Percentage of inspections performed at interval required by statute A 98% 98% 96.05% 97% 96% 97% 97%
3. Percentage of inspections where education and training is provided to food establishments C 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of Focus on Food Safety classes given C 93 39 90 95 80 85 85
5. Number of Food and Lodging inspections performed A 15,836 18,058 20,530 20,500 21,520 21,000 21,000

_

Grain Warehouse


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Defunding the Grain Warehouse program will have a significant negative effect on the Kansas economy by not ensuring that Kansas grain producers have safe, solvent warehouses where they may store their commodities as required by state statute.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Public Warehouses (1907) KSA 31-101 et seq. - supervision and regulation of all public warehouses storing grain. Grain Warehouse Law (2007) KSA 21-3711, 21-3736, 21-3737 - criminal acts relating to grain warehouses. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Protect grain depositors by performing subsequent exams of all licensed public grain warehouses once a year to ensure there are no losses due to fraud or mismanagement of records and grain quality is kept to the standards set forth by the State of Kansas.

B. Provide a high level of customer service by completing special examinations when requested and measuring new facilities to add to licensed storage space or approve conditional storage space

C. Accelerated examinations for noncompliance to maintain a system that ensures zero loss to depositors by identifying and deterring fraud in the grain warehouse industry

D. Professional Development

Program History

In 1907, Kansas enacted its first warehousing laws. The early farmers recognized the need for government to regulate the grain industry much in the same way it regulated banks. The primary goal for the program has not changed in more than 100 years. The Grain Warehouse Inspection program administers and enforces the Kansas Public Warehouse Law relating to grain storage. It requires that any entity that stores grain for the public be licensed by either the state or federal government. It ensures that Kansas grain producers have safe, solvent warehouses where they may store their commodities. To achieve this, the program examines state-licensed facilities at least once each year. More examinations are made on licensed facilities that meet only the minimum financial requirements. A licensed elevator, with the approval of the Grain Warehouse Inspection program, may move open stored grain to another licensed, bonded terminal elevator. This allows smaller facilities to free up bin space for the next harvest. Also, with approval from the program, licensed facilities may use emergency or conditional storage space during harvest when storage space is in short supply. This allows the elevator to better serve Kansas crop producers. Examinations help eliminate fraud in the grain industry, ensure the quantity of stored commodities in Kansas licensed warehouses, maintain the percentage of loss to producers at zero.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of licensee complaints B 0 0.64 0 0 0 0 0
2. Number of grain warehouse failures A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Percent of annual examinations completed A 92% 78% 85% 95% 90% 100% 100%
4. Bushels of licensed storage A 547,640,983 557,040,000 565,279,000 570,000,000 575,855,000 469,656,000 469,656,000
5. Number of accelerated examinations C 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

_

Laboratory


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Agricultural products and commodities that pose a public health/safety hazard would likely result in foodborne or feedborne illness. Lack of fairness in commerce from inaccurate weighing and measuring devices or improperly labeled feeds, fertilizers, and pesticides.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Weights and Measures Law (1947) KSA 83-201-224 - metrology lab and services Commercial Feeding Stuffs (1923) KSA 2-1001 et seq. Fertilizer Law (1907) KSA 2-1201 et seq. Soil Amendment Act (1975) KSA 2-2801 et seq. Agriculture Liming Materials Act (1976) KSA 2-2901 et seq. Pesticide Law (1976) KSA 2-2438a et seq. Meat and Poultry Inspection Act (1969) KSA 65-6a18 et seq. Dairy Inspection KSA 65-771 through 791 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Protect consumer and animal health through multiple chemical and microbiological analyses of various food products sold in Kansas

B. Evaluate ongoing technical competency of analysts through completion of proficiency testing

C. Professional development of laboratory staff

Program History

Started 1953 to ensure quality of fertilizers, seeds (former), animal feeds, dairy products, livestock remedies (former), pesticides; Metrology lab was established in 1971; Added: meat and poultry, metrology, industrial hemp; Relocated lab during pandemic from Topeka to Manhattan in March 2020.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Attend conferences and complete trainings remain current with issues of regulatory testing (percentage of quarters on track or completed) C 78% 74% 92% 90% 100% 100% 100%
2. Analysts complete proficiency testing for analytes on scope of accreditation (percentage of quarters on track or completed) B 94% 88% 77% 85% 92% 95% 95%
3. Report test results within established times (percentage of quarters on track or completed) A 58% 89% 79% 90% 81% 90% 90%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Lab trainings completed in Qualtrax A 275 163 724 750 1,269 570 570
5. Number of ISO-accredited and NIST-certified test methods A 66 63 67 68 67 46 46

_

Meat and Poultry


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Kansas would be non-compliant with Federal law for meat inspection and we would loose federal funding. Either USDA would have to provide inspection services or meat processing could not continue. In the absence of inspection, meat and poultry products that pose a food safety hazard may enter the human food supply. Product adulteration and the incidence of economic fraud would have to be reported and investigated by another agency or not addressed.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Meat and Poultry Inspection Act (1969) KSA 65-6a18 et seq. - ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections, regulatory oversight of meat and poultry processing, individual slaughter allowance. Food and Advertising Sales Practices (1984) KSA 50-901 et seq. - inspection, produce and price representation. Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Provide a fair-minded regulatory environment to the Kansas meat and poultry inspection industry to ensure our "equal to" status with FSIS

B. Ensure that required sampling is done during the calendar year

C. Facilitate growth and education to new and existing businesses

Program History

Kansas Meat and Poultry Inspection Program started in 1969 under the Kansas Department of Agriculture when the Meat and Poultry Inspection Act was created.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Regulatory sampling in accordance with Federal and State requirements B 99.4% 100% 100% 100% 99.5% 100% 100%
2. Fairly regulate Kansas meat processing facilities (number of slaughter, processing and custom plants) A 86 103 105 118 110 115 117
3. Provide education materials and guidance to facilitate Industry growth (slaughter numbers) C 51,991 62,371 - - 52,247 51,000 52,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Inspections performed (slaughter, compliance, patrols) A 9,554 9,968 9,923 12,000 10,633 10,700 10,750
5. Required samples collected B 796 766 827 1,000 728 741 741
6. Total businesses licensed by M&P including processing, slaughter, wholesalers, animal food, broker and warehouses. C 404 526 580 610 649 670 690

_

Pesticide & Fertilizer


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Pesticide and Fertilizer Program needs funding to ensure it meets its statutory and regulatory duties. If the Pesticide and Fertilizer Program is not funded and the statutory and regulatory duties are not met, it is likely that pesticide misuse complaints would increase and such complaints would not be investigated; consumers would not know if a product was properly registered in Kansas; and there would be no oversight of chemigation process which may result in an increased likelihood of groundwater contamination. Additionally, not adequately funding the Pesticide and Fertilizer Program may result in Kansas losing primacy under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) which would likely increase the presence of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the state, including additional federal enforcement actions being pursued against Kansas businesses.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Fertilizer Law (1907) KSA 2-1201 et seq., ensures that fertilizer products are properly labeled and safely stored; governs the storage and transport of anhydrous ammonia and licensure of individuals who blend fertilizer products. Agricultural Chemical Act (1947) KSA 2-2201 et seq., governs the registration of pesticide products that will be distributed, sold, delivered, and transported in the state. Soil Amendment Act (1975) KSA 2-2801 et seq., requires registration and proof of efficacy for any substance which is intended to improve physical, chemical or other characteristics of the soil, or improve crop production. Pesticide Law (1976) KSA 2-2438 et seq., governs pesticide use in Kansas, provides for licensure of pesticide businesses and dealers, and provides for training and certification of pesticide applicators in the state. Chemigation Safety Law (1985) KSA 2-3301 et seq., requires registration of all water points of diversion that will be used in the chemigation process. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Efficiently apply state resources to provide an equitable and balanced regulatory environment

B. Maintain Kansas primacy under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act to facilitate Kansas agriculture and restrict federal enforcement for noncompliance by Kansas pesticide business

C. Grain program efficiencies by continuing to develop and streamline the Agriculture Information Management System (AIMS) to provide online opportunities for licensure and product registration

Program History

The Pesticide and Fertilizer Program works to ensure compliance with Kansas statutes and regulations governing products that are used to control pests or to enhance plant growth. The Program strives to achieve its mission through compliance assistance and outreach education; complaint investigation; and monitoring inspections. The Kansas Department of Agriculture has been responsible for pesticide and fertilizer regulation since the implementation of the various statutes identified above. In approximately 1999, the Pesticide and Fertilizer Program was integrated after the fertilizer section was transferred from the Agricultural Commodity Assurance Program.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Promptly investigate pesticide misuse complaints in an attempt to determine a single source of the misuse by completing 90% of the investigations within 30 days A 93% 100% 100% 100% 94% 90% 90%
2. Monitor at least 30% of the recertification training programs occurring in Kansas so EPA requirements are met and quality recertification training programs are provided to commercial applicators B 50% 71% 73% 50% 66% 30% 30%
3. Provide opportunities for individuals to obtain and/or renew commercial applicator certification by proctoring at least 50 pesticide applicator certification examination sessions B 52 70 64 50 72 50 50
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Total number of certification exams taken in Kansas B 5,152 2,502 3,068 2,500 3,597 2,500 2,500
5. Total number of pesticide misuse complaint investigations completed by the Pesticide and Fertilizer Program A 99 85 80 80 87 80 80

_

Plant Protection & Weed Control


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Defunding the Plant Protection and Weed Control program will have a significant negative effect on the Kansas economy. Important plant safeguarding, export certification, consumer protection, and industrial hemp licensing activities will not be completed as require by state statute.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Seed (1925) KSA 2-1415 et seq. - ensure seeds are tested and labeled accurately. Plant Pest Act (1965) KSA 2-2112 et seq. - licensing and inspection of plant dealers, certification of Kansas commodities, plant pests and diseases, and quarantine authority Barberry Eradication Act (1951) KSA 2-2712 et seq. - black stem rust and common barberry nuisances. Noxious Weed Act (1943) KSA 2-1314 et seq. - control of noxious weeds. Commercial Industrial Hemp Act (2019) KSA 2-3901 et seq. - cultivation of industrial hemp in a research and future commercial program. Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Safeguarding: Provide a system to safeguard Kansas' native and cultivated resources by excluding and/or early detection of high-profile exotic pests of regulatory significance which also allow the continued export of Kansas-produced plants and plant products.

B. Export Commodity Assurance: Provide export commodity assurance for Kansas-produced commodities so that the pest freedom requirements by other states and foreign countries are maintained to allow expeditious movement of those commodities in foreign and domestic trade.

C. Pest Management: Manage, control, or eradicate select pest of regulatory significance that are established in the state and provide technical expertise to program cooperators involved in pest control.

D. Ensure that seed offered for sale meets label guarantees and contains no noxious weeds or restricted weed seed exceeding allowed quantities.

E. Industrial Hemp Program: Enabling Kansans to take advantage of the new alternative crop in Kansas.

F. Staff Training: Professional development and internal training

Program History

The purpose of the Plant Protection and Weed Control program is to: protect the state's native and cultivated plants from the introduction and outbreak of harmful plant pests, including insects, plant diseases, weeds and other organisms; provide inspection and certification services to ensure compliance with statutes and quarantines and to facilitate movement of plants and plant products to other states and countries; manage pests of regulatory significance within the state; ensure that plants, plant products, and seed offered for sale in Kansas meet the requirements of the Plant Pest and Agricultural Commodity Act, the Kansas Seed Law, the Kansas Noxious Weed Law, and the Commercial Industrial Hemp Act.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Acres of compliant industrial hemp harvested (harvest occurs during the next FY after a license is issued) E 1,831 761 260 482 523 500 500
2. Number of complaints from clients B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. Number of quarantines for harmful plant pests A 6 6 6 6 6 7 7
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of export certificates issued B 8,082 7,788 9,282 8,000 9,683 8,500 8,500
5. Number of licensed industrial hemp producers E 218 81 61 60 40 40 40
6. Number of live plant and seed dealer inspections A, D 575 702 580 700 445 550 550
7. Sites surveyed for harmful plant pests A 2,890 3,179 4,607 5,000 2,779 3,500 3,500

_

Water Appropriations


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Certificates, permits, changes to water rights, would not be processed and issued. Water use reporting data would not be collected. Private property rights would not be protected. The state's economy would be hurt by not allowing water to be put to a beneficial use. Some water users would take advantage of their neighbors by using more water than authorized.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 42-701-730 (irrigation districts) KSA 68-2201-2215 (junkyards and salvage control) KSA 74-506a-506d, 74-510 - (Division of Water Resources) KSA 74-509 (irrigation plants) KSA 74-2610, 2622 (Kansas Water Authority and Kansas Water Office) KSA 82a-601-647 (rural water) KSA 82a-701-737, 740, 42-303, 313 (water appropriation) KSA 82a-954 (water protection) KSA 82a-1020-1040 (groundwater management districts) KSA 82a-1301-1320 (water plan storage) KSA 82a-1330-1348 (water assurance) Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Process applications to appropriate water and changes to existing water rights in Kansas

B. Ensure water rights and the resources are protected

C. Conduct field work, public outreach, and transparent rule development

Program History

We administer the Water Appropriation Act which allocates water to our citizens with terms, conditions, and limitations that provides a framework of first in time is first in right to the water. This allocation method maximizes the use of water for the best economic benefit and protects private property rights.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of water use data received online B 90% 91% 92% 93% 92% 94% 95%
2. Amount of water conserved, in acre-feet B, C 11,876 11,951 11,951 12,000 10,683 12,000 13,500
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Number of Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) B, C 50 53 53 50 44 50 55
4. Water use reports processed B 12,121 12,153 13,067 13,000 12,044 12,100 12,100

_

Water Management


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Not funding this program would severely jeopardize Kansas's ability to secure its water supply from Colorado on the Arkansas River, and from Colorado and Nebraska on the Republican River. Not funding this program would also eliminate the agency's ability to use state of the art hydrologic modeling and analysis tools to develop, implement, and evaluate water management tools and strategies leading to poor management of water resources and economic harm to local and regional economies.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 2-1915, 1919, 1930 (conservation measures) KSA 12-635-638, 12-1616b, 12-766 (flood control/mapping) KSA 24-105, 126 (levees) KSA 24-656-668 (drainage districts) KSA 24-1201-1237 (watershed districts) KSA 42-701-730 (irrigation districts) KSA 68-2201-2215 (junkyards and salvage control) KSA 74-506a-506d, 74-510 - (Division of Water Resources) KSA 74-509 (irrigation plants) KSA 74-2610, 2622 (Kansas Water Authority and Kansas Water Office) KSA 79-201g, 82a-405-410 (water storage) KSA Chapter 82 (Waters and Watercourses) Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Protect Kansas water supplies through administering the KS-CO Arkansas River Compact

B. Protect Kansas water supplies through administering the KS-CO-NE Republican River Compact

C. Continue to encourage the development and use of sound science to inform water management decisions

Program History

The water management services program is responsible to administer the state's four interstate river compacts, provide technical assistance to the water appropriation program, evaluate complex hydrologic scenarios to enhance water management, investigate groundwater impairment claims, and maintain and enhance the official water rights information database.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Provide technical support to facilitate Enhanced water management (requests filled) C 1 1 1 1 1 2 2
2. Protect Kansas entitlement under Ark River Compact (acre-feet of water) A 147,189 98,174 62,149 150,000 33,230 70,000 70,000
3. Protect Kansas entitlement under Republican River Compact (acre-feet of water) B 333,300 247,750 143,933 200,000 119,063 120,000 120,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Acres of Colorado inspected for compact compliance A 21,500 22,300 22,155 22,300 22,355 22,400 22,400
5. Hydrologic evaluations to facilitate LEMAs, WCAs and management strategies (staff hours) C 5,408 5,500 5,724 5,700 5,435 5,500 5,500
6. Meetings with CO & NE leadership on compact issues B 18 21 19 20 20 20 20

_

Water Structures


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Severe private and public property damage or loss of life could occur due to failure of aging dams and other water structures, inappropriate floodplain development or poor construction of water structures. Private property rights could be infringed upon by neighbors constructing dams or other structures that are not properly designed. The citizens of Kansas would not be able to participate in the NFIP to help cover loss costs associated with disasters. Perspective property buyers and current owners would not have accurate data on flooding risks.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 82a-301-328 (stream obstruction) KSA 24-105, 126 (levees) KSA 12-635-638, 12-1616b, 12-766 (flood control/mapping) KSA 82a-325-327 (environmental coordination) KSA 24-1201-1237 (watershed districts) KSA-82a-1601-1609 (small lakes) Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Regulate dams, stream modifications, levee and floodplain fills for the protection of life, property, and public safety

B. Ensure effective community engagement and risk communication

C. Increase public awareness of floodplain management, stream obstructions, and channel changes

Program History

The Water Structures Program reviews projects that involve dams, stream modifications, levees, floodplain fills and provides technical assistance and coordination for local communities participating in the National Flood Insurance Program for the protection of property and public safety. These duties were authorized starting in 1929 with the passage of the Obstructions in Streams Act and Levee Law.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Community interaction to produce accurate floodplain maps. Outcome based on number of effective maps per year. - 1 5 10 7 5 5 6
2. No loss of life and property damage due to water structure failures. Outcome based on number of lives lost. A, C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. Reduce NFIP claims through regulation, community engagement and public awareness (net total NFIP claims) A, B, C 99,580 730,021 635,420 1,000,000 68,967 250,000 250,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Conduct RiskMAP public meetings (number of meetings) B, C 84 92 80 75 86 85 85
5. Processing time for general permits (days) A, C 14 11 8 14 9 14 14
6. Processing time for stream obstruction, channel change, floodplain fill and levee permits (days) A, C 42 33 34 35 33 35 35
7. Processing times for dam permits (days) A, C 112 221 224 180 136 180 180

_

Weights & Measures


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Weights and Measures provides traceability for Kansas Weighing and Measuring Devices to the National System of Weights and Measures Standards and Performance Testing. This ensures equity in the marketplace for Kansans and facilitates trade locally, nationally and internationally. Failure to maintain accurate weighing and measuring devices harms Kansan's, both purchasers and sellers. This harm is economic and results in many millions of dollars in lost revenue annually for Kansans. If trust in the weighing and measuring system is lost it could also result in lost trade and/or the requirement for traded items to be weighed elsewhere which would add additional cost for businesses. As an example there are some scales in Kansas over which several billion dollars of beef are traded annually. For a single scale trading 3 billion dollars of beef, a 0.1% error would result in 3 million dollars of lost revenue to either the beef producers selling beef or to the packing plant buying it. While we don't have the data to determine the value of all products sold annually in Kansas, it is easy to see how very small errors can have significant revenue impacts for Kansans irregardless of the product, beef, grain, oil, fuel, steel, gravel, cement, milk, chemicals, etc.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Weights and Measures Law (1947) KSA 83-201-224 - metrology lab and services, monitoring and testing of scales, packages, and scanners. Device Inspection (1985) KSA 83-301-311 - annual testing of commercial weighing devices by licensed service companies. Petroleum Products Inspection Law (1935) KSA 55-422-427, 55-429, 55-433-447 - inspection of fuel dispensers. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (1952) KSA 83-143-149 - inspection of weighing and measuring devices, sale tickets. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Utilize available resources efficiently

B. Improve compliance education

C. Improve program coverage

Program History

KDA inspects all retail fuel devices every 18 months, these devices have a compliance rate around 90%. Other commercial devices such as scales, non-fuel meters, propane meters, moisture meters etc. are required to be inspected annually by a licensed service company, these devices have a compliance rate around 50%. KDA inspects a small portion of all non fuel devices on an annual basis. Do to the reliance on private service companies KDA no longer has the equipment or staffing to perform inspections of all device types and has not kept pace with new technology entering the market place such as Mass Flow Meters, Electric Vehicle Charging stations, Grain Moisture Meters, etc.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of failed price verification (PV) inspections A 55% 51% 46% 50% 46% 45% 45%
2. Total number of complaints A, B, C 89 97 103 100 87 - -
3. Percent of fuel inspections in compliance (new measure) - - - - 0.0% 86% 85% 85%
4. Percent of scale inspections in compliance (new measure) - - - - 0.0% 84% 85% 85%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Number of airport devices inspected C 67 190 137 120 83 No Longer Used No Longer Used
6. Number of educational events / price verification trainings B 13 42 84 50 94 85 85
7. Total number of fuel inspections A 24,401 25,233 27,530 25,000 28,634 26,000 26,000
8. Total number of price verification (PV) inspections A 361 588 1,610 700 485 490 490
9. Total number of scale inspections A 17,533 18,661 23,697 18,000 13,061 15,000 15,000

Kansas Department of Health and Environment--Environment

_

Bureau of Air


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Air program would be implemented by the Environmental Protection Agency in Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 65-3005, 65-3024 Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Meet all National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

B. Conduct air quality compliance inspections

C. Maintain an air permitting program for the State of Kansas (Average cost per permit)

Program History

In 1985, the Kansas Legislature created the Kansas Asbestos Act to protect citizens and asbestos workers from exposure to this hazardous air pollutant. The Federal Government implemented the Clean Air Act in 1993 and Kansas implemented the Kansas Air Quality Act in 1993.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Average cost per air permit maintained ($/# of permits) C $5,097 $5,079 $6,873 $10,644 $5,987 $5,990 $5,990
2. Conduct air quality inspections B 859 767 546 600 740 600 600
3. Number of Counties in compliance with all NAAQS A 105 105 105 105 105 105 105
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Percentage of Counties in compliance with all NAAQS A 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
5. Compliance rate for facilities inspected B 97.6 99.2 99.8 > 95 0.996 >.95 >.95
6. Percent of permits issued within required time constraints C 97.3% 98.4% 98.2% > 95% 98.6% >95% >95%

_

Bureau of Environmental Remediation


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Contaminated sites or permitted facilities will have or potentially have uncontrolled release of petroleum or hazardous chemicals causing harm to human health and the environment. Increase of human exposure to hazardous materials, petroleum substances and other toxic materials. More involvement of the US Environmental Protection Agency in Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Environmental assessment, response and cleanup: KSA 65-161; 65-171; 65-3453 to 65-3457; 65-34,141 et seq.; 65-34,161 et seq.; 82a-901 et seq.; 42 U.S.C. Chapter 103. Petroleum Storage Tank: KSA 65-34,100 to 65-34,139; 40 U.S.C. Chapter 1. Environmental Stewardship and Redevelopment: KSA 65-1,221 et seq.; 65-34,176 et seq.; 65-34,177 et seq.; 75-5672. Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act - Public Law 107-118 which amends CERCLA. Surface Mining: KSA 49-401 to 49-433; 30 U.S.C. Part 700 et seq. Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Promote redevelopment of contaminated properties to allow beneficial use of dilapidated or impacted properties

B. Maximize pollution prevention measures to prevent release of stored chemicals

C. Improve environmental health conditions for Kansans through contaminated site assessment, response and cleanup

Program History

Current configuration of the bureau was formed in response to the passage of the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (Superfund).

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cost of oversight for contaminated sites where imminent and substantial threats to public health and the environment were removed or mitigated in a timely and adequate manner. (Cost/site) C $18,546.25 $15,581.68 $30,994.48 $14,803.59 $11,011.04 $11,001.04 $1,101.04
2. Number of acres available for new redevelopment and improvement of contaminated and potentially contaminated properties. (CELR, Brownfield, Storage Tanks) A 957 619 460 500 467 450 450
3. Number of regulated facilities where pollution prevention measures are in place to prevent future contamination and impacts to human health and the environment. (Storage Tank, Dry Cleaners and Coal) B 14,849 14,843 14,951 1,490 11,135 11,000 11,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of Aboveground storage tanks registered B 9,267 9,274 9,380 9,400 9,448 9,450 9,470
5. Number of Brownfields Targeted Assessments completed for local government and non-profit organizations/ year A 41 63 45 45 57 45 45
6. Number of CELR's issued per year A 244 181 46 75 45 30 30
7. Number of Coal mines permitted B 3 3 1 1 0 0 0
8. Number of Dry Cleaner Facilities registered B 61 61 60 60 62 60 60
9. Number of Facilities with Tank UST upgrades - single-wall to double-wall program A 4 4 1 4 1 5 5
10. Number of Facilities with UST tank removals in the redevelopment program - abandoned tank removal A 16 7 3 5 21 15 15
11. Number of sites with active environmental assessment/cleanup (used to calculate Outcome Number3) C 2,060 2,060 2,060 2,050 2,050 2,040 2,030
12. Number of Underground storage tanks permitted B 5,518 5,505 5,300 5,490 5,685 5,600 5,550

_

Bureau of Waste Management


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Bureau of Waste Management implements all regulations for solid waste disposal areas and processing facilities, waste tire management, hazardous waste generators and transporters, and hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities in Kansas. Failure to fund the program would result in no regulatory oversight of solid and hazardous waste management activities in Kansas causing public health and environmental impacts including: illegal dumping; surface and groundwater contamination, and; public safety and nuisance conditions like fires, odors, litter and disease vectors. EPA would implement the hazardous waste programs in Kansas, and KDHE would forfeit about $1.1 million annually in federal hazardous waste program funding.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 65-3401 et seq. KSA 65-3430 et seq. Mandatory Yes and No 1

Program Goals

A. Review active and closed solid waste landfill groundwater monitoring reports in a timely manner in order to coordinate response actions at landfills where off-site groundwater contamination is detected above the regulatory limit.

B. Maintain a compliance rate of 90% or higher among permitted solid waste facilities and hazardous waste generators by conducting routine inspections and providing compliance assistance and operator training.

C. Oversee the regulation of all hazardous and solid waste facilities in Kansas in accordance with the authorizing statutes. The unit cost was estimated by dividing the total number of facilities subject to regulations by the total program funding budgeted for each state fiscal year.

Program History

The KDHE is the only state agency to implement the solid and hazardous waste programs authorized by the statutes referenced above. The Kansas Solid Waste Management Act was adopted in 1970. Key revisions occurred when KDHE sought approval from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to administer federal solid waste rules promulgated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1993,1996 and 2009. The Solid Waste Program regulates solid waste disposal areas and processing facilities and waste tire handling; offers compliance assistance to regulated entities, and; provides financial support and grants to local entities. The Hazardous Waste Management Act was adopted in 1981. Key revisions occurred when KDHE sought approval to administer federal rules in 1985 and 2013. Under the hazardous waste program KDHE regulates generators of hazarous waste and permits facilities that treat, store and/or dispose hazardous waste to ensure proper cradle-to-grave management.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent (%) of facilities in compliance. B 95% 99% 99% 97% 99.5% 96% 96%
2. Cost of regulatory oversight per regulated facility. C $2,598 $2,536 $2,438 $2,831 $2,831 $2,907 $2,907
3. Number of landfills where offsite groundwater contaminant levels exceed the regulatory standard. A 7 16 17 17 17 17 17
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Inspection reports reviewed for potential enforcement due to non-compliance. B 385 498 509 450 576 450 450
5. Landfill groundwater monitoring reports reviewed. A 190 180 190 190 147 150 155
6. Total number of solid and hazardous waste facilities regulated. C 2,396 2,437 2,598 2,477 2,477 2,425 2,425

_

Bureau of Water


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Implementation of the Safe Drinking Water Act would revert to the Environmental Protection Agency. KDHE's technical assistance and training would be eliminated. Kansas would lose $1.1m annually through the Public Water Supply Supervision Grant, and would lose $8.3-$16.6m annually from the Capitalization Grant which supports the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. Public health and the environment could be jeopardized by improperly operated and maintained water supply and water pollution facilities. Implementation of the Clean Water Act would also return to the Environmental Protection Agency, including enforcement which would be a burden on our towns and industry . Most wastewater systems would suffer from lack of training and technical assistance. Approximately six millions dollars annually of federal funding would be lost. Program elimination also eliminates the state's ability to protect water supplies for municipalities, industries, livestock and irrigation and reduce pollutant loadings crossing statelines.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
K.S.A 65-163, et seq K.S.A 65-171d, et seq KSA 65-171m, KSA 55-1117, KSA 82a-1201, et seq Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Monitor water quality of Kansas waters to assist in development of water quality standards and total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and to track environmental changes for water quality improvement.

B. Provide subsidized financing (low interest loans) for municipal water infrastructure projects through the Kansas State Revolving Fund Programs to return and maintain municipal water and wastewater systems into compliance.

C. Oversight of public water supply systems, wastewater and stormwater facilities, underground injection control (UIC) wells, and underground hydrocarbon storage (UHS) wells with regards to standards, regulations, and technical assistance (979 public water supply systems, 1853 wastewater facilities, and 3404 stormwater facilities, 73 UIC wells, and 368 UHS wells for a total of 6,677).

Program History

The origins of the Bureau of Water began in 1885 when the first rules and regulations pertaining to protecting water supplies were adopted by the Ks Board of Health (now KDHE). In 1907, the first statute prohibiting unpermitted sewage from entering waters of the state was approved and in 1927 the Kansas Board of Health was charged with preventing pollution found to be a public health or aquatic life threat. In 1933, the Legislature established laws pertaining to pollution prevention from livestock facilities. In 1972 the Federal Water Pollution Control Act was passed by Congress and in 1974 Congress approved the Safe Drinking Water Act. The Kansas Legislature responded in 1974 by creating the Kansas Department of Health and Environment as a cabinet-level agency to implement the two Federal laws as well as the accompanying state statutes.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Regulatory Cost per Permit Issued C $1,476 $1,397 $1,627 $1,701 $1,422 $1,454 $1,480
2. Percent of Water Systems in Compliance B 91.1% 92.4% 93% 93.2% 78.7% 93% 93%
3. Number of Water Bodies Restored A 272 272 278 278 278 280 280
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of Monitoring Sites A 373 340 392 350 311 315 315
5. Number of New SRF Loans B 25 32 34 30 39 32 32
6. Number of Wastewater Permits Issued C 398 208 257 300 301 325 340

_

Environmental Field Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Implementation of all environmental programs would revert to the Environmental Protection Agency and funds for aid to locals would be curtailed.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Statutory mandates as required of the four other Division of Environment programs (Air, Water, Waste Management, Environmental Remediation). KSA 65-166a; K.S.A 65-171d; KSA 65-1,179-1,199; KSA 65-171g-h; 33 U.S.C. 319, 401, 404. Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Conduct compliance inspections/complaint investigations/spill responses

B. Issue permits for confined animal feeding operations

C. Reduce non-point source pollution

Program History

In SFY 2018, the program was re-aligned to include the Livestock Waste Section and the Watershed Management Section, which allows field based programs to better work together. Total budget for this program includes significant amount of funding (state and federal) that is passed through as aid to locals.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percentage of Compliance inspections/complaints/ spill response A 59% 68% 68% 68% No Longer Used No Longer Used No Longer Used
2. Percentage of current National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit coverage to Confined Animal Feeding Operations of 1,000 animal units or more B 96% 95% 95% 96% 94.6% 95% 95%
3. Dollars per pound of nitrogen reduced from surface water C $10.69 $9.72 $6.81 $8.90 $9.08 $10.15 $10.15
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Average cost per CAFO permit ($/# of permits) (new measure) - $312.74 $303.10 $312.81 - $352.05 $421.26 $419.94
5. CAFO permits active B 3,145 3,179 3,192 3,195 3,196 3,200 3,200
6. Compliance inspections/complaint investigation/spill response completed A 4,574 4,141 4,745 4,800 4,348 4,500 4,500
7. Number of Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy projects established C 31 31 31 31 32 34 34

_

Office of Laboratory Services (Kansas Health and Environment Laboratories)


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Infants could go undiagnosed and experience permanent or life threatening disorders. The public would have greater exposure to viruses and diseases. Outbreaks could go undetected due to no investigative testing capacity. Increase risk and cost to Kansans due to poor water quality and decreased monitoring. Public Water Suppliers would have to find outside laboratories to perform testing and Kansas would have to contract with and designate a Primacy Laboratory or else have the program taken over by EPA. EPA would take over drinking water program, Clinical Testing Labs would not be evaluated for accurate performance, intoxicated drivers would remain on the highways.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-5608 KSA 2000 Supp 65-153f; KSA 65-674; 65-677; KSA 2000 Supp 65-180 KSA 65-157; KSA 48-1601 et.seq, Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Laboratory KSA 65-101, 109a; KSA 65-1,109; KSA 65-1,,425 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Conduct clinical and environmental testing with a high degree of accuracy as measured by performance on proficiency tests.

B. Maintain staff flexibility and continuity of operations by ensure that staff are cross trained in multiple methods and that each method has multiple staff that can perform it

C. Process samples for both Clinical and Environmental purposes as measured by number of samples and average price per test. Noting that much of the budget provided in 2020,-2023 includes significant budgets that included pass through equipment, supplies and testing costs.

Program History

History: The first biological and chemical analyses for Public Health and Protection were performed in 1886 at the Kansas Board of Health. In 1907, the Environmental Microbiology laboratory began analyzing water and wastewater for public health as a part of the Division of Sanitation. This was the first lab that would become what is now Kansas Health and Environmental Laboratories (KHEL). When the Kansas Department of Health and Environment was established by legislative action in 1974, the combined health and environmental laboratory was located in the Forbes Field complex. Named in statutes as the Office of Laboratory Services, the Division of Health and Environmental Laboratories became part of the Division of Environment in FY 2007. The total funding shown for the program in FY 2020 through FY 2023 represents COVID funding to support not only the laboratory operations but many supplies and equipment provided to partners throughout the state to fight the COVID 19 Pandemic.


Kansas State Fair

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Kansas State Fair is a Fee Funded organization that is reliant on dollars brought in to afford the programs that it supplies to the citizens of the State of Kansas. If these programs are not funded, there would be no way that we would be able to have a State Fair.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 2-201 through 2-205 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Support the Mission of the Kansas State Fair - To promote and showcase Kansas agriculture, industry, and culture; to create opportunity for commercial activity; and to provide an educational and entertaining experience that is the pride of all Kansans.

B. To enhance the professional development and retention within the Kansas State Fair Team.

C. Increase in efficiency and effectiveness of State Fair program implementation and administration

Program History

In 1913, the Kansas Legislature declared the "Official" Kansas State Fair be located on 112 acres in Hutchinson that was donated by the citizens of Reno County and was authorized by KSA #2 201 through 2-205. KSA #74 520 through 74 525 designated the Kansas State Fair Board as the responsible body to organize and present the annual State Fair. These funds take care of the day to day operations of the Fair to include but not limited to staffing, office equipment, marketing and the like.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Facebook & Instagram Organic Ad Reach (NEW) C 0 0 1,772,000 2,000,000 - - -
2. Increase Attendance at Fair - 0 281,000 315,273 325,000 - - -
3. New Reporting methods for Social (2022). More difficult to calculate total impressions - FB & Instagram - reports reach vs impressions - Paid Advertising (NEW) C 0 0 4,900,000 5,500,000 - - -
4. Number of full-time employees retained B 15 21 26 26 - - -
5. Total number of impressions views through our Social Media platforms - Facebook, Instagram, Google Ads, YouTube, Snapchat, and Tik-Tok C 7,500,000 12,500,000 0 0 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
6. Increase Grandstand Entertainment Lineup A 0 450,000 675,000 800,000 - - -
7. Increase Sponsorships opportunities at Kansas State Fairgrounds A 648,000 598,675 624,594 674,000 - - -
8. Number of Non-Fair Events per year C 560 540 568 570 - - -

_

Capital Improvements


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Kansas State Fair is a Fee Funded organization that is reliant on dollars brought in to afford the programs that it supplies to the citizens of the State of Kansas. If these programs are not funded, there would be no way that we would be able to have a State Fair.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 2-201 through 2-205 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide the Kansas State Fairgrounds, which encompasses approximately 280 acres with 75 buildings and nearly 24 acres under roof, as a safe and secure facility for all Kansans and guests to the State.

B. To ensure the safety and security to all patrons on the Kansas State Fair through continual improvements to facilities and grounds

Program History

In 1913, the Kansas Legislature declared the "Official" Kansas State Fair be located on 112 acres in Hutchinson that was donated by the citizens of Reno County and was authorized by KSA #2 201 through 2-205. KSA #74 520 through 74 525 designated the Kansas State Fair Board as the responsible body to organize and present the annual State Fair. These funds take care of the day to day operations of the Fair to include but not limited to staffing, office equipment, marketing and the like.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Amount invested Building and Grounds Repairs from Kansas State Fair Fee Fund A 499634.74 209771.21 249151.47 586,500 - - -
2. Amount spent for Capital Improvements A 386464.31 449290.35 469007.58 13,973,883 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Time spent (per month in hours) inspecting and repairing facilities and grounds based on two full-time employees B 65 50 75 75 - - -
4. Turn around time for work orders to be completed (days) B 5 5 3 3 - - -

_

Facilities


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Kansas State Fair is a Fee Funded organization that is reliant on dollars brought in to afford the programs that it supplies to the citizens of the State of Kansas. If these programs are not funded, there would be no way that we would be able to have a State Fair.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 2-201 through 2-205 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide the Kansas State Fairgrounds, which encompasses approximately 280 acres with 75 buildings and nearly 24 acres under roof, as a safe and secure facility for all Kansans and guests to the State.

B. The State Fair is the state's largest single event and typically attracts more than 300,000 people annually, plus an estimated 200,000 people to the more than 600 non-fair events held throughout the year.

Program History

In 1913, the Kansas Legislature declared the "Official" Kansas State Fair be located on 112 acres in Hutchinson that was donated by the citizens of Reno County and was authorized by KSA #2 201 through 2-205. KSA #74 520 through 74 525 designated the Kansas State Fair Board as the responsible body to organize and present the annual State Fair. These funds take care of the day to day operations of the Fair to include but not limited to staffing, office equipment, marketing and the like.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. No loss of life, injury or property damage due to safety issues A 0 0 0 0 - - -
2. Rentals from Fairgrounds Facilities - Fair time and Non-Fair time - 777,445 448,342 506,792 516,928 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Conducting Risk Assessments for Facilities (Monthly) A 12 12 12 12 - - -
4. Major Facility Upgrades or remodels A,B 1 2 5 5 - - -

Kansas Water Office

_

Public Water Supply Program


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The ability to meet water supply demands of all customers of the PWS programs in accordance with existing long-term contracts and operations agreements, ensuring that the state continues to meet its current and future obligations associated with state-owned water supply storage, and continued operations and analysis to effectively protect, maintain, and secure state-owned storage to support the needs of the citizens of Kansas will be limited.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
82a-1301 et seq. 82a-1330 et seq. 82a-1604 et seq. 82a-2301 et seq. 82a-2401 et seq. Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Ensure that the water supply needs of the citizens of Kansas are met in an economical and efficient manner.

B. Ensure that municipal, industrial and irrigation water rights on the major rivers have an adequate water supply during drought conditions.

C. Effectively utilize storage to lengthen support during low flow conditions.

Program History

The Kansas Water Office (KWO) operates the Kansas Water Marketing, Water Assurance and Access District programs as part of its overall Public Water Supply (PWS) Program. KWO has developed the Public Water Supply Program Comprehensive Capital Development Plan (CCDP) in order to account for all revenue and expenses related to the State's public water supply storage, and to provide for the long?term planning of future program needs, including acquisition of all the water supply storage under federal contracts, potential new storage development and protection and restoration of the storage owned by the State. Various funding sources contribute to KWO's overall PWS Program and are represented as part of the CCDP. These funding sources are the Water Marketing Fund, Water Assurance Fund, and Access District Fund.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of industrial customers directly served. B 15 15 15 16 15 15 17
2. Number of irrigation water rights directly served. B 51 51 51 56 58 62 57
3. Number of people directly served (Based on population estimates). A 1,245,959 1,258,914 1,272,084 1,344,078 1,335,688 1,402,473 1,472,596
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Percentage of time demands are met - all PWS programs C 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

_

Water Planning and Implementation


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Without KWO water planning and implementation efforts, Kansas will not be able to plan and meet current and future water supply demands now for the Ogallala Aquifer region as well as from areas served by reservoir water supply storage. Kansas would also not be able to fully coordinate on planning and implementation activities to address water quantity and quality issues impacting Kansas as identified in the Kansas Water Plan. At the current rate, with no changes during Vision implementation, the Ogallala Aquifer will be 70 percent depleted and our reservoirs will be 40 percent filled with sediment within the next 45 years.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
74-2622; 82a-901 et seq.; 82a-1301 et seq.; 82a-1330 et seq.; 82a-1401 et seq.; 82a-2301 et seq.; 74-2613; 74-2608; 82a-220; 82a-733; 82a-901 et seq.; 82a-1101 et seq.; 82a-1401 et seq.; 82a-1501a; 82a-1801 et seq.; 82a-2101 Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Develop and propose water policies that are long-term in scope.

B. Identify and address priority water resource issues in Kansas.

C. Support the Kansas Water Authority in its role of making policy recommendations to the Governor and Legislature.

D. Measure the condition of the water resources of the state.

E. Provide adequate technical analysis and background to support the development of policy and priority issues.

F. Measure and assess the status and effectiveness of practices and projects implemented through the State Water Plan.

G. Be an active participant in water resources policy formation and recommendations that result in legislation.

H. Foster a trust in the planning process which is conducted in an open public forum and based on sound research.

I. Involve the public and stakeholders in the development of proposed policy initiatives.

J. Create electronic and written publications in a format and style that the public finds accessible.

K. Annually host a Governor's Conference on the Future of Water in Kansas to disseminate information and encourage public engagement in water issues.

Program History

The Water Planning and Implementation program covers the major agency responsibility for the development and coordination of implementation efforts of the Kansas Water Plan. These development and coordination of implementation efforts provide a collaborative framework to extend the life of the Ogallala-High Plains Aquifer; secure, protect and restore Kansas reservoir water supply; improve our state's water quality; reduce our state's vulnerability to extreme events (including flood and drought); as well as increase overall awareness of Kansas water resources. The administration of the Kansas Water Planning Act, Kansas Weather Modification Act, and portions of the Water Appropriations and Water Transfer acts are housed in this program. This program also houses the Kansas Water Authority, which is statutorily within the Kansas Water Office. The Authority is responsible for advising the Governor, Legislature, and the Director of the Kansas Water Office on water policy issues; approving the Kansas Water Plan; accounting for and making recommendations on the expenditures of State Water Plan Funds; and approving water storage sales, water marketing rate setting, federal contracts, administrative regulations, and legislation proposed by the Kansas Water Office. The Authority is composed of 24 members (13 voting, 11 ex-officio) that represent stakeholder groups and are informed of water-related issues representing water users, water interests, environmental interests, and the general public.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of digital interactions. J 799,807 524,239 306,000 525,000 525,000 575,000 575,000
2. Number of people engaged in public meetings and conferences. I 2,462 2,947 1,725 3,000 8,500 10,000 11,000
3. Vision/Kansas Water Plan Action Items underway or completed. B 249 258 262 262 No Longer Used - -
4. Percent of Kansas Water Plan Action Items underway or completed. (new measure) - - - - - - 30% 40%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Research and technical studies underway and completed. H 15 16 16 16 16 16 16
6. State of the Resource reports underway or completed. D 14 14 14 14 14 14 14

Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

All accounting, Budget, purchasing, licensing, Legal, Public Affairs, and IT functions are accounted in this division

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801,32-802,32-805 Discretionary No 2

Program Goals

A. To provide accurate and timely accounting practices to the agency.

B. To provide a quality and reliable platform for licenses and permits to be sold to the public and to maintain historical data to predict license trends

C. To provide accurate and timely information and purchasing services to our internal customers. To provide internal customers the information required to make an acceptable service. To process and track all purchases made by the Agency

D. To publish and distribute accurate information in a timely manner that is informative and meaningful

Program History

The administration division has historically been split between the Pratt office and the Secretary's office in Topeka. This division contains the Licensing, Purchasing, accounting, budget, Legal, and IT sections of the Department. This is the division that makes the agency function.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Wildlife Fee Fund Revenue (license and permit sales) A 30,244,492 32,592,355 35637145.68 32,000,000 - - -
2. Number of Fishing Licenses Sold A 251,349 218,895 196,931 200,000 - - -
3. Number of Hunting Licenses Sold A 117,082 130,537 128,170 130,000 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of Combo hunting/fishing licenses sold A 41,490 42,390 40,455 41,000 - - -
5. Number of Lifetime Licenses Sold A 958 1,352 1,123 1,200 - - -
Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
6. Boating Fee Fund Revenue A 1,272,922 1,917,760 1448471.2 1,200,000 - - -
7. Number of Deer Permits sold A 184,334 196,359 191,348 190,000 - - -
8. Number of Turkey Permits sold A 37,042 48,883 42,446 40,000 - - -

_

Ecological Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Negative impacts to critical habitats for state listed threatened and endangered species could cause additional decline in population levels that could cause extirpation of the species from the state. Without the review and permitting process for impacts to wildlife additional species could be added to the Federal endangered species list and thus removing jurisdiction from state to federal authority. Part of this reviews includes reviews all KDWP grants for compliance and non-compliance with state and federal laws (Section 7 consultation and NEPA) which without this measure could result in the loss of federal funding for conservation programs agency wide. These reviews are completed in house to reduce cost for the agency that may be required to conduct environmental assessments for each grant funded project causing increased cost per project. Administration of the Section 6 Cooperative Agreement with US Fish and Willdife Service is also within the sections duties and without this agreement being maintained each year the state wildlife agency would be in further non compliance with the Federal ESA.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801,32-802,32-805, 32-957 through 32-963, 32-1012, 32-1033, 82a-325 through 82a.327 Mandatory No 8

Program Goals

A. Conduct project reviews for activities that impact fish and wildlife resources. Reviews are conducted on projects carried out by private individuals, industry, local,, state and federal governments as allowed under statute and regulations.

Program History

The Ecological Services Section was established in 1987 during the reorganization of Fish and Game Commission and the Parks Resource Authority to one department. The section was developed to provide technical input to many agricultural and nonagricultural related projects. The addition of both federal and state environmental protection laws such as the National Environmental Policy Acts and federal Clean Water laws and regulations mandated that KDWP become more actively involved as the voice of the state's wildlife resources. The passing of the federal Endangered Species Act of 1973 and subsequent passing of the Kansas Nongame and Endangered Species Act in 1975 mandated additional KDWP involvement with project reviews and the development of the nongame, threatened and endangered species program in the state. Subsequent state laws (Water Project Environmental Coordination Act KSA 82a-325 to 327) requires review of water projects in the state and their impacts to other natural resources including threatened and endangered species. In 2005, Ecological Services Section developed the first State Wildlife Action Plan, a plan developed to keep common species common by conserving wildlife and habitat before they become to rare and costly to restore. Through this process a list of species of greatest conservation need was developed and is the cornerstone to receiving federally funding from the State Wildlife Grants Program. The Ecological Services Section is responsible for programs related to non-game, threatened and endangered species, biodiversity, watchable wildlife, climate change (including alternative energy development), and private lands management. The section is responsible for administering State Wildlife Grants (both appropriated and competitive grant funds), Section 6 cooperative agreement and grants, Cooperative Service Agreements with the USFWS and the Chickadee Checkoff Program. The section is also responsible for upholding the threatened and endangered species project review program pursuant to the Kansas Nongame and Endangered Species Act of 1975. In addition, the section is responsible for addressing a diverse array of wildlife interest ranging from T&E to watchable wildlife. Programmatic objectives involve developing collaborative partnerships and committees (e.g. Kansas Nongame Advisory Council, T&E Task Force, Teaming With Wildlife)as well as the development and implementation of the State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP).

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Annual average # of action permits required per projects reviewed A 0.012 0.0077 0.007 0.01 - - -
2. Average # days for response for review. 30 days mandated timeline A 23.68 25.37 21.36 25 - - -
3. Number of Projects Reviewed for KNESCA - 2,093 2,464 2,399 2,200 - - -
4. Number of Scientific Collection Permits - 114 128 115 125 - - -

_

Education Division


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The consequenses of not funding this program include the loss of long standing and integral education programs such as hunter education and outdoor skills workshops, as well as the five nature and wildlife education centers in Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801,32-802,32-805; 32-920 - 924, 32-912 - 914; 32-1139 - 1143 Mandatory No 7

Program Goals

A. Connect people to the KDWP mission through strategies to engage with and support customers with broad experiences and backgrounds as they participate in and enjoy the outdoor opportunities of Kansas.

B. To produce safe, knowledgeable, responsible and legal hunters and fur harvesters who will support wildlife management strategies that produce healthy populations of wildlife for the enjoyment of the people of Kansas, and to assist all individuals in developing awareness, knowledge, skills and commitment to result in safe, responsible behavior and actions concerning the use of Kansas' wildlife resources.

C. Inspire life-long learning through outdoor skills programs and outreach efforts designed to enhance the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of Kansas' natural resources.

Program History

Nearing a 50 year anniversary and one of the most successful outdoor education programs delivered by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, the Hunter Education program was created in 1973 and owes this success to the dedicated Kansas hunter education instructors that teach this program. The program funding is made possible through the excise taxes collected on hunting and shooting equipment (Pittman Robertson Act) which pays for classroom materials and training equipment. The Pratt Education Center was converted from the first fish culture school of Kansas University, built in 1913, into the agency's first nature center, established in 1966. Located in the Flint Hills, the Milford Nature Center was built adjacent to the Milford fish hatchery and opened its doors in 1991. The Great Plains Nature Center, the result of a partnership between KDWP, the friends of the Great Plains Nature Center, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the City of Wichita, opened its doors in 1996. The Kansas Wetlands Education Center, a partnership between KDWP and Fort Hays State University, opened in 2009. In 2013, KDWP took over operations of the Southeast Kansas Nature Center through a lease agreement with the city of Galena.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of Boater Education Public Programs - 120 50 7 100 - - -
2. Number of Hunter Education Public Programs B 300 230 265 300 - - -
3. Number of Schools teaching Outdoor Skills Programs (Hunter Ed, Student Air Rifle Program, National Archery in the Schools) C 383 394 402 450 - - -
4. Number of visitors at all Nature Centers A 248,820 239,591 209,361 250,000 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Number of Boater Education Students Certified C 1,750 2,370 2,423 2,000 - - -
6. Number of Hunter Education in our Schools student participants C 899 701 1,135 1,000 - - -
7. Number of Hunter Education Students Certified B 7,659 5,216 5,970 8,000 - - -
8. Number of National Archery in the Schools student participants - 11,593 10,383 7,294 12,000 - - -
9. Number of Student Air Rifle Participants C 0 38 132 250 - - -
10. Total Nature Center program Participants A 87,087 15,117 23,030 85,000 - - -

_

Fisheries


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

A dramatic reduction of fishing opportunity in Kansas. Jeopardize the fate of an estimated 400,000 anglers that spend approximately $295 million dollars in Kansas each year. A predictable loss of sport fish that experience poor natural recruitment on their own due to degradation of habitat. Further degradation of habitat due to lack of manpower and funding to mitigate these issues. Loss of human respect and stewardship of our natural resources and heritage.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801,32-802,32-805 Mandatory No 3

Program Goals

A. The Fisheries Division goals are to Conserve Kansas sport, non-sport, and threatened and endangered fishes, the water they rely on, and their habitats.

B. Increase fishing opportunity. Increase fishing success.

Program History

The Fisheries Division is responsible for maintaining and creating fishing opportunity and improving fishing quality across the state. It is also responsible for conserving and enhancing fisheries resources. Fisheries Division programs are tailored to meet the special needs of anglers. For example, the Urban Fishing Program provides fishing in areas where demand for fish exceeds supply by stocking catchable size fish throughout the fishing season. On the other end of the spectrum is the lack of public water in western counties. The Department's private water leasing program is designed to create new fishing opportunities in portions of the state that are under served. The fisheries program strives to respond to the needs of all anglers regardless of their location.

Kansas waters hosted an estimated 400,000 anglers for 4,694,000 fishing trips according to the 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation (conducted every five years by the US Census Bureau). Because of its widespread popularity, recreational fishing is an important industry in Kansas. Anglers in Kansas spend over $295 million each year.

The organizational sections of the fisheries Division are Management, Research, and Fish Culture. These sections work hand-in-hand to improve fishing in Kansas, protect the aquatic environment, and to educate the public on matters relating to aquatic life. The fisheries program is multifaceted, working with the fish habitat, the fish themselves, and the public who benefits from these precious natural resources

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Angler satisfaction derived from creel surveys (% rated their trip 2 or higher out of a scale of 1 to 5) - 70% - - 70% - - -
2. Number of bait shops inspected for ANS A 125 0 100 75 - - -
3. Number of city and county entities receiving Community Fisheries Assistance Program (CFAP) leases B 124 123 123 123 - - -
4. Number of completed research projects A 8 8 9 8 - - -
5. Number of core-panel gill nets deployed for monitoring trends in fish populations A 900 933 889 907 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
6. Number of channel catfish intermediates stocked from our hatcheries A 322,636 348,806 270,455 313,965 - - -
7. Number of predacious fingerlings stocked from our hatcheries A 1,471,846 1,099,849 1,828,228 1,466,641 - - -

_

Law Enforcement


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
STATUTORY HISTORY: In 1911, KSA 32-107 established that "ownership of and title to all wild animals, birds and fishes, both resident and migratory, in the state, not held by private ownerships legally acquired, shall be and are hereby declared to be in the State". In 1927, KSA 74-3301 et. seq., as amended, established the Forestry, Fish and Game Commission as the state agency charged with authority, control and jurisdiction over the conservation of the natural resources of the state dealing with wildlife and its habitats. Since they were originally enacted, several additions to the original charges to the Commission have been made by the Legislature in KSA chapters 32 and 74. These included the authorization to establish open and closed seasons and bag limits on "any species of game, game birds or other birds, fish and furbearing animals", and to disseminate information for the public good. In 1969, KSA 82a-804 through 819 directed the Commission to assume responsibility for recreational boating safety and law enforcement on public waters in Kansas. In 1975, KSA 32-501 through 510 directed the Commission to conduct investigations and establish programs for the conservation of nongame, threatened, and endangered species. In 1987 the Kansas Fish and Game Department was combined with the Kansas Parks Authority to form the Kansas Wildlife and Parks Department. During this time, the statutes and regulations were recodified to address the merger. In 2011 the Governor, by executive order, merged the Department of Tourism with the agency. At the beginning of FY 1995 restructuring of the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks was initiated to address better management of Wildlife Fee Fund, Park Fee Fund, Boating Fee Fund and State General Fund expenditures. With this change, the Law Enforcement Division relinquished responsibilities in Kansas State Parks. At present, the Law Enforcement Division focuses on fisheries, wildlife and boating law enforcement and is funded only from Wildlife Fee Funds and Boating Fee Funds at the state level. In 2018, the Law Enforcement Division was taken from under the Assistant Secretary of Wildlife and the LE Director/Colonel was placed in the capacity of an agency assistant secretary. The Law Enforcement Division has created a strategic plan to guide the division into the future. The plan includes six goals, made up from both community and organizational goals. These goals and this plan will be the bases for performance measurement and will drive law enforcement activity going forward. NA NA NA

Program Goals

A. Provide public health & safety for all public lands users through pro-active management and law enforcement

Program History

The Law Enforcement Division is responsible for the statewide enforcement of state and federal fish and wildlife laws, boating laws, and public lands regulations. These enforcement activities occur on private and publicly owned lands within the state. In addition to these primary law enforcement duties, these officers also assist federal, state and local law enforcement agencies in a support role when requested. Their assistance is provided for warrant service and arrest of wanted fugitives, enforcement of controlled substance laws, and response to emergency management. The Division also plays an active role in providing information and educational programs concerning hunter education, boating safety, and other natural resources related programs.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Boating Inspections A 1,499 947 1,307 1,500 - - -
2. Landowner Contacts - 2,875 2,459 3,501 2,900 - - -
3. Licensed Anglers Checked A 14,262 13,208 11,607 12,500 - - -
4. Licensed Fur harvesters Checked - 606 578 621 600 - - -
5. Licensed Hunters Checked A 6,430 6,904 9,795 7,500 - - -
6. Sportsmen Contacts A 23,763 19,087 19,666 24,000 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
7. Alcohol Related Contacts A 218 192 120 200 - - -
8. Boating Violations A 1,202 288 292 1,000 - - -
9. Drug Arrest A 9 21 24 20 - - -
10. Operation Game Thief Complaints A 236 1,367 928 850 - - -
11. Wildlife Damage Complaints A 366 371 312 375 - - -

_

Parks


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Management of the 25 state parks and the prairie spirit trail would be lost.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801, 32-802,32-805 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To effectively manage, protect, and administer the state's parks, its visitors, and associated wildlife efficiently, while providing a diversity of quality outdoor recreation experiences with special regards toward natural resource protection.

B. To promote Kansas' quality outdoor recreation activities and quality of life experiences.

C. To enhance the public's knowledge of the importance of outdoor recreation to the Kansas economy.

Program History

In 1955, the Kansas Legislature adopted a public policy providing for state parks and facilities by creating the Kansas Parks and Resources Authority. In 1958, they appropriated funds for operations and created Kanopolis State Park. Additional parks were added legislatively by statute as years passed, and in 1987 Governor Mike Hayden merged the Kansas Parks and Resources Authority and the Kansas Fish and Game Commission into the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks. Governor Sam Brownback added Tourism to the Department in 2011. The Parks Division is responsible management and operations of 28 designated state parks, including Little Jerusalem Badlands State Park and Flint Hills Trail State Park. These areas include 8,000 acres of maintained lawn grass, 32,200 acres of park-land resources, over 510 miles of trails, over 280 miles of roads, more than 10,000 campsites, 35,000 acres of recreational surface water, over 1,000 structures; complete sewer systems including 81 lagoons, over 160 lift stations with 2 pumps each and treatment plants; 24 potable water systems, and more than 3,000 miles of utility lines. The Division expects over 7 million visitors this year. On average, each employee is responsible for 74,000 visitors annually. A major effort is placed on public safety, law enforcement and providing a family atmosphere where children and adults can have an enjoyable, safe experience. Over 220 special events are provided annually that enhance quality-of-life experiences for our visitors and generate significant economic impact for surrounding communities and the state

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cabin Fee Fund Revenue A, B, C 1,337,057 1,777,908 1,530,077 1,530,000 - - -
2. Park Fee Fund Revenue A, B, C 11,504,597 13,989,164 12,995,395 12,900,000 - - -
3. Park vehicle permits sold A, B, C 185,976 202,205 175,000 187,800 - - -

_

Public Lands Measures


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Loss of habitat, loss of diversity, reduction in stable wildlife populations. Decline in outdoor recreation participation by public. Outdoor activities have been shown to have physical and mental health benefits and promote community interaction and resource appreciation. Negative socio-economic impact both at a local and statewide level due to low hunting/fishing participation, resource visitation, and reduced spending at associated industries.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801,32-802,32-805 Mandatory No NA

Program Goals

A. To Optimize public access for hunters, anglers, and other compatible recreational opportunities; Conserve, manage, and optimize wildlife and their habitats

B. Provide appropriate infrastructure to support hunting, fishing, and other compatible recreational opportunities

C. Provide public health and safety for all public lands users through pro-active management and law enforcement

Program History

In 1926 the first state fishing lakes were constructed at Neosho and Meade. The first public land acquisition occurred in 1939 for the Finney Game Refuge utilizing Pittman-Robertson federal aid funds. In 1942, acquisition of land for public hunting access began at Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area. This was the beggining of public access areas for hunting and fishing in the State of Kansas. The Public Land Division is responsible for the management of 412,000 acres of public land and water; this represents approximately one percent of the land base of Kansas. The primary responsibility is to provide a multitude of diverse habitats for wildlife species of Kansas. The public lands program is funded solely by the Wildlife Fee Fund and revenue generated from management activities that benefit wildlife. Ninety percent of all hunters and fishermen in Kansas will spend part of their hunting and fishing activities, on public land or water within any one year. The heavy use by hunters and fishermen requires safe and sanitary facilities on wildlife areas and state fishing lakes. The Public Lands program is responsible for the management of 129 projects. These projects are funded from the Wildlife Fee Fund and some are included in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Programs that reimburses up to 75 percent of approved activities designed to benefit fish and wildlife and hunters and anglers. These properties annually receive approximately four million plus, visitation-days by hunters, anglers and wildlife viewers. Vehicles and equipment will be replaced according to replacement schedules and need. Upgrades will be examined on overall benefit and effectiveness to enhance operations and safety. Temporary and seasonal employees will supplement the work loads placed on FTE's, during heavy use periods and activities that require assistance. Operations and maintenance expenditures are adequate to maintain minimal standards, and replace some worn-out equipment.

Besides Wildlife Fee Funds, the Public Lands Division contracts agricultural activities on land licensed from the Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation and state lands. Revenue generated from these activities is placed in separate unlimited accounts for each area. Federal landowners require revenue be returned to the area within five years for wildlife benefit. Approximately $2,000,000 is generated and expended annually from these funds which are (unlimited) and are not a stable source of income.

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Electronic access permit accounts A - - 6,404 6,500 - - -
2. Electronic access permit check-in's A - - 50,790 52,000 - - -
3. License Checks C 3,295 4,153 3,750 3,000 - - -
4. miles of fence maintained B 630 630 650 637 - - -
5. miles of roads & trails maintained B 450 450 450 - - - -
6. Number of boat-access areas maintained - 135 135 135 135 - - -
7. Number of bridges and LW crossings maintained - 66 66 66 66 - - -
8. Number of buildings maintained - 220 224 224 223 - - -
9. Number of dams/dikes/levee's maintained - 180 180 185 182 - - -
10. Number of man-days for recruitment/retention - 372 486 450 450 - - -
11. Number of public-use facilities maintained - 935 935 935 940 - - -
12. Number of signs maintained - 6,675 6,700 6,700 6,692 - - -
13. Number of special events conducted/hosted - 17 16 16 20 - - -
14. Number of special hunts offered - 823 1,053 1,050 1,055 - - -
15. Patrol Hours C 4,500 5,000 6,000 5,167 - - -
16. Public Contacts C 8,115 8,715 9,350 8,000 - - -
17. Total Acres of Habitat Management (land &water) A 441,549 442,641 443,515 444,515 - - -

_

Wildlife


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Loss of habitat, loss of diversity, reduction in stable wildlife populations. Decline in outdoor recreation participation by public. Outdoor activities have been shown to have physical and mental health benefits and promote community interaction and resource appreciation. Negative socio-economic impact both at a local and statewide level due to low hunting/fishing participation, resource visitation, and reduced spending at associated industries.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
32-801,32-802,32-805 Mandatory No 6

Program Goals

A. To monitor wildlife populations and their habitats, and to assess public appreciation, demand and tolerance for wildlife resources and department programs.

B. Provide programs designed to conserve, protect and enhance wildlife habitat.

C. Provide wildlife related recreational opportunity.

Program History

The Wildlife Division includes research and surveys, and management. Wildlife Division projects are funded from the wildlife fee fund. Most projects qualify for 75 percent reimbursement through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service federal aid to Wildlife Restoration Program. The research and survey program provides projects that measure trends in big game, upland game birds, migratory game birds, and furbearers. Harvest, hunter success and human dimensions information are obtained from hunter surveys. Information provides the basis for objective administration of seasons, permit quotas, regulations and management program planning. Research targeting specific wildlife management problems or environmental issues are accomplished within this section. Contracting for professional services is the primary means for accomplishing research objectives. The wildlife management program provides for a statewide initiative to improve upland game populations by improving upland game habitat. The walk-in-hunting-access program (WIHA) designed to lease private land for public hunting access is coordinated by management personnel. Other operations include assistance to public land management, agricultural liaison, animal damage control, species reintroduction, animal rehabilitation, and interaction with other governmental and private organizations concerning wildlife management.

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Acres of habitat impacted by upland game bird habitat program - 245,000 302,789 308,450 309,000 - - -
2. Acres signed into walk-in-hunting-access program (WIHA) C 1,195,366 1,181,461 1,158,997 1,117,382 - - -
3. Number of hunter and landowner surveys conducted A 11 11 12 12 - - -
4. Number of wildlife population monitoring surveys conducted A 16 16 15 16 - - -

EDUCATION

EDUCATION

State Historical Society

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Without the Administration program, the Kansas Historical Society programs mandated by statute could not function as the Administration program provides centralized support for all other programs, ensuring the agency uses state resources in a responsible and productive way. Without this program there would be no security, no human resources, no business office, no working physical plant, or IT services. There would be no security or maintenance and preservation of the state's 57 buildings under the care of the agency. Communication to the public would also collapse in terms of the agency's website and public response. The Administration program covers all indirect costs.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: - KSA 75-2701 through 75-2705 establishes the Kansas Historical Society as a state agency. Specific - KSA 75-3148 gives the executive director the authority to hire staff. The enabling legislation also outlines specific duties such as collecting. Specific - KSA 76-2056 allows for the Kansas Historical Society to rent space to outside groups for events and meetings and charge for the use of the space. Specific - The executive director is assigned by statute to sit on a variety of committees including the Capitol Preservation Committee (KSA 75-2268 through 75-2269), Council on Travel and Tourism (KSA 32-1410 through 1411), and the Governor's Residency Advisory Commission (KSA 75-129 through 131). Discretionary Yes 2

Program Goals

A. Ensure the agency uses public resources wisely by taking regular public feedback, updating agency priorities annually, and practicing fiscal responsibility.

B. Providing management of the agency's buildings and structures, as well as the agency's IT infrastructure.

C. Ensure all staff and visitors are safe and that all agency communications are transparent and easily accessed.

Program History

The administrative functions have been part of the Kansas Historical Society since it was formed in 1875. In 1990 the agency obtained legislation to operate a third-party rental program for agency facilities.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Annual cost per visit for total agency program usage A $0.29 $0.29 $0.38 $0.38 $0.32 $0.33 $0.33
2. Number of formal complaints about the facilities received BC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. Number of page views on kshs.org BC 3,496,887 3,762,955 3,479,927 3,600,000 3,103,060 3,200,000 3,200,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of fiscal transactions processed by the agency A 4,448 4,445 3,618 4,000 3,572 3,500 3,500
5. Number of social media posts which told Kansas historical stories C 2,263 2,142 2,872 2,500 2,507 2,600 2,600

_

Archives


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the Administration program is not funded, the agency would not be able to maintain a Director, Chief Fiscal Officer or Director of Human Resources. If these positions and other requisite expenditures were not funded, the agency would not maintain central oversight of all other agency programs.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: - KSA 45-401 through 45-414 creates the official state archives. Specific - KSA 64-106 through 64-107 allows the agency to certify records for counties in the case of lost records. Specific - KSA 75-3501 through 75-3520 establishes and defines the state's records board. Specific - KSA 45-215 through 45-223 encompasses the open records act. Specific - KSA 58-2005 through 58-2011 establishes the handling of land survey records. Specific - KSA 75-2250 through 75-2251 authorizes the law enforcement memorial on the Capitol grounds is the responsibility of the Kansas Historical Society as the keeper of the records of fallen officers. Specific - KSA 75-104 relates to the transfer of Governor's records to the Kansas Historical Society. Specific - K.A.R.118-3 procedures and fees for land survey program. Specific - K.A.R. 118-1 procedures for deaccessioning of collections. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Collaborate with Kansas state and local government officials to draft and submit to the State Records Board new and revised records retention and disposition schedules that accurately reflect contemporary government business practices and provide records management training to Kansas state and local government officials.

B. Collect, preserve, and make available to the public Kansas state government records with enduring, or permanent, value housed in the State Archives with access provided in-person and/or digitally.

C. Process current land survey reference report filings and providing land surveyors with access to historical land survey records housed in the State Archives.

Program History

Functions of the State Archives have been part of the Kansas Historical Society since it was founded in 1875. The Land Survey Program and the Law Enforcement Memorial were transferred to the agency in the 1980s. All functions are mandated by statutes.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cost per research request performed by staff B $13.07 $14.21 $14.22 $14.25 $14.51 $14.30 $14.30
2. Number of land survey requests filled annually C 471 751 607 650 1,018 800 800
3. Number of reference visits in-person and digitally B 2,091,027 2,019,381 1,691,066 1,900,000 1,656,915 1,701,500 1,701,500
4. Number of Records Retention Schedules created or revised A 224 148 97 100 81 100 100
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Amount of cubic feet of state records processed into the State Archives A 259 17 1,634 450 47,263 1,600 1,600
6. Number of items digitized to allow public to view online B 128,183 3,816 92,832 100,000 737,570 250,000 100,000

_

Cultural Resources


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Without the Cultural Resources program, there would be no state recognition and protection for historic structures and sites. Several state and federal economic development programs would be discontinued, and the state would no longer financially assist businesses and historic property owners, seriously impacting the economies of communities across Kansas. This could lead to a decline in business districts and neighborhoods in some small towns. There would be no protection of antiquities and unmarked burials in the state as prescribed by state and federal legislation. Since this program acts as a liaison to tribal governments historically affiliated with the state, not funding this program could affect tribal relations. Federal law requires a review of all federally funded activities in the state to ensure that important cultural resources are not lost or at least mitigated. Without this program, many other state and private projects could be shut down or delayed without qualified reviews (i.e., road development, cell tower construction, utility repairs). The state owns 15 State Historic Sites that would not be cared for or open to the public and schools.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – Federal National Historic Preservation Act, P.L. 89-665 directs the state to survey and recognize the state's cultural resources, support Certified Local Governments, review federal projects in the state to ensure the protection of significant cultural resources. Specific – KSA 75-2715 through 75-2725 makes historic preservation an official policy of the state. Specific – KSA 75-2729 and 79-3107b establishes the Heritage Trust fund directing the agency to provide grants to owners of historic properties. Specific – KSA 79-32,211 creates the state preservation tax credit program. Specific – KSA 74-5401 through 74-5408 establishes the Kansas Antiquities Act which prohibits the gathering of antiquities without a permit. Specific – KSA 75-2741 through 75-2754 regulates the excavation, study, and display of human remains and goods from unmarked burial sites. Specific – KSA 75-2711 establishes Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2001 through 76-2002 establishes John Brown Museum State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2005 established Pawnee Rock State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2006 through 76-2007 establishes Fort Hays State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2002 through 76-2012 establishes Shawnee Indian Mission State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2017 establishes Hollenberg Pony Express Station State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2021 through 76-2022 establishes Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2023 through 76-2024 establishes Kaw Mission State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2030 through 76-2031 establishes Grinter Place State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2034 through 76-2035 establishes Goodnow State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2040 through 76-2043 establishes Mine Creek Civil War Battlefield State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 76-2052 through 76-2054 establishes Constitution Hall State Historic Site. Specific – KSA 2057 established Red Rocks State Historic Site. Specific – Cottonwood Ranch State Historic Site, First Territorial Capitol State Historic Site, and the Last Chance Store State Historic Site were brought to the agency through the appropriations process. Specific – K.A.R. 118-1 procedures for deaccessioning of collections. Specific – K.A.R. 118-2 procedures for deaccessioning of human remains. Mandatory Yes 60/40 1

Program Goals

A. Administer the nomination procedures of the Register of Historic Kansas Places and the National Register of Historic Places and facilitate identification of historic resources in the state, while providing incentives such as state and federal tax credits and Heritage Trust Fund grants for the rehabilitation of such properties.

B. Meet all state and federal requirements in evaluating potential effects on the state's historic and cultural resources, providing mitigation opportunities when necessary, and cooperating with tribal, city, and county governments.

C. Preserve and operate the state-owned historic sites, opening to the public at least six months of the year.

Program History

State and federal laws enacted beginning in the 1960s were established to protect the state's cultural resources. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 was amended in 1970 and 1980 and is the basis of some of these program activities. Federal money allocated to Kansas for these activities are matched by the state (60% federal and 40% state). The Heritage Trust Fund (1990) and the Historic Preservation Tax Credits (2001) were established by state statute. The State Historic Sites were acquired by the state between 1899 and 2015, by statute or through budget appropriations.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cost per visitor at the State Historic Sites* C $21 $25 $23.53 $24 $13.82 $20 $20
2. Archeology sites cleared B 270 240 225 250 275 250 250
3. Economic impact of the state and federal historic preservation tax credits A 466 jobs and grew the Kansas economy by $19,262,900 1,132 jobs and grew the Kansas economy by $57,530,026 1,706 jobs and grow the Kansas economy by $69,300,200 1,000 jobs and grow the Kansas economy by $50,000,000 645 jobs and grow the Kansas economy $26,608,900 1,200 jobs and grow the Kansas Economy by $50,000,000 1,200 jobs and grow the Kansas Economy by $50,000,000
*Visitors in FY 2020
and FY 2021
were limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Staff reviews of state and federal projects potentially impacting cultural resources B 4,307 5,634 3,777 4,000 7,267 5,000 5,000
5. Total financial incentives distributed A 28,974,638 16,509,542 6,532,056 10,000,000 10,951,695 11,000,000 11,000,000

_

Education


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the Administration program is not funded, the agency would not be able to maintain a Director, Chief Fiscal Officer or Director of Human Resources. If these positions and other requisite expenditures are not funded, the agency would not maintain central oversight of all other agency programs.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
General: - KSA 72-1117 requires a course in Kansas history and government in all public schools. General - State curricular standards mandated by the State Board of Education require the teaching of State history. General - KSA 58-4001 through 58-4013 govern the museum collections. General - KSA 75-2728 allows the museum to maintain insurance for loss or damage to the collections. General - The building of the Kansas Museum of History and the operations at the Capitol Visitor Center were designated through the appropriations process. General - K.A.R. 118-1 procedures for deaccessioning of collections. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Ensure excellence in teaching by producing curriculum materials that explores the stories of Kansas, while educating students on research skills that are practical and applicable to everyday life.

B. Provide information to the public at the Capitol Visitor Center and interpret Kansas government to K-12 students and the public through tours, programs, and exhibits, emphasizing civic engagement.

C. Operate the Kansas Museum of History to tell the stories of Kansas by maintaining exhibits based on the state's artifact collections and developing specialized school tours aligned to state curriculum standards.

Program History

The functions of the Education program have been part of the Kansas Historical Society since it was formed in 1875. The state history museum began originally in the Capitol and in 1914 moved to the Memorial Building. The current Kansas Museum of History opened its doors to the public in 1984. In 1988 when the state began requiring a course in Kansas history and government for all students there was an outcry from the schools asking for curriculum materials to satisfy this requirement. With the knowledge and support of the State Department of Education, the Kansas Historical Society agreed to take on this role. Kansas history, government, economics, and geography are included in state curricular standards.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Annual cost to serve visitors to the Kansas Museum of History and Capitol Visitor Center combined BC $16 $13 $15.86 $17.50 $14.10 $15 $15
2. Capitol Tour Participants B 28,312 1,220 28,071 40,000 37,455 38,000 38,000
3. Number of K-12 school tour participants* AC 6,095 0 7,074 5,000 2,649 3,000 7,000
4. Participation in curriculum activities A 44,030 65,751 101,101 100,000 76,184 80,000 80,000
*Visitors in FY 2020
and FY 2021
were limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. E-newsletter distributed to Kansas educators A 6,160 5,056 4,907 5,000 3,361 4,500 4,500
6. Number of Traveling Resource Trunks loaned to schools A 133 21 112 115 147 150 150

State Library

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
NA NA NA NA

Program Goals

NA

Program History

NA

_

Aid to Locals


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
NA NA NA NA

Program Goals

NA

Program History

NA

_

Reference Division


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the Reference Division was not funded, Legislative constituents would not be able to ask an accurate and trusted source for information about legislation, legislative procedure, or who their legislators are and how to contact them. One-of-a-kind documents produced by state agencies would be unaccessible to Kansas taxpayers and decision makers and and most likely lost for future use.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: - KSA 46-1212: "One of the functions of the state library shall be to provide library services to the legislative branch of state government." Specific - KSA 75-2534: "The state library shall provide library and informational services to the judicial, legislative and executive branches of the state government...." Specific - KSA 75-2541 requires each book to be cataloged. Specific - KSA 75-2566 through 2568 requires the library to " establish, operate and maintain a publication collection and depository system" and is authorized to adopt regulations to implement and administer the act. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide library resources and research support to members of the Kansas Legislature and state agencies.

B. Assisting Kansans in identifying legislation and understanding legislative procedure.

C. Preserve and provide access to the publications of state government.

Program History

The Reference Division is composed of a reference program that provides direct assistance to inquiries from and about all branches of Kansas government. The other program within the Reference division is state documents and cataloging. This program organizes information produced by Kansas government to assist current and future research needs regarding Kansas government. The Organic Act of 1855 specified a library “to be kept at the seat of government for the use of the governor, legislative assembly, judges of the supreme court, secretary, marshal, and attorney of said territory …” Organic Act: An Act to Organize the Territory of Kansas (1855) Sec. 33. This requirement is still the goal of the Reference Division at the State Library but utilizing modern resources. L. 1862 ch. 187, Sec. 35 through 41 provided for the management of the State Library, requiring a catalog and books to be loaned and returned. L. 1883, ch. 26 appropriated funds “for page and messenger in the state library during legislative session.” L.1909, ch. 16, Sec. 19 required the State Library to "establish and maintain a legislative reference department of such [state] library". From about 1909 until 1929 legislative reference work and bill drafting were performed by a member of the State Library staff known as the “Legislative Reference Clerk.” The Legislative Reference Department was moved to the Revisor of Statutes when that office was created in 1929. Library staff still performed research and worked “in close cooperation with the Revisor of Statutes in accumulating and filing for quick reference material on legislation.” Book of the States, 1935, Chapter III. L. 1963, ch. 422 created the State Library as it is now. That law provided for “library and informational services to the judicial, legislative and executive branches…” L. 1971, ch. 184, Sec. 12 provided “one of the functions of the state library shall be to provide legislative reference services.” Sec. 34 required the state librarian to employ personnel “to perform legislative reference services and functions.” January 14, 1974, the Legislative Hotline began at the State Library, taking messages for legislators, giving hearing dates and times, and status of bills. This service was added at the request of the legislature. L. 1976, ch. 358 established a publication collection and depository system that would avoid costly duplication of library materials and facilitate easy retrieval of state documents. This was the result of an interim study to the 1971 legislature (Prop. No. 39). In 2008 library staff began using instant messaging to answer legislative reference questions.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Average cost per search using databases available only to agencies and legislative staff A $0.58 $0.53 $0.51 $0.52 $0.48 $0.47 $0.46
2. Cost of content management system per page viewed in KS Government Information Library C $0.11 $0.08 $0.09 $0.10 $0.12 $0.11 $0.11
3. Number of contacts supplied for legislators B 689 661 398 500 434 456 479
4. Number of information requests responded to by the agency B 3,490 3,114 2,608 3,000 2,925 3,072 3,226
5. Number of materials loaned A 2,476 1,592 2,050 2,250 2,839 2,981 3,130
6. Number of page views annually to KS Government Information Library C 70,841 100,131 89,965 90,000 81,637 85,719 90,005
7. Number of requests from known state employees A 482 280 386 400 535 562 590
8. Number of searches using databases available only to agencies and legislative staff A 110,109 118,998 127,897 130,000 134,617 141,348 148,415
9. Number of views to the KS Government Information Library blog C 5,480 8,434 2,090 2,250 No longer used - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
10. Average annual cost for online databases available only to state agencies A $7,267 $8,037 $9,390 $9,648 $9,176 $9,452 $9,735
11. Number of blogs submitted promoting KS Government Information Library C 44 50 34 40 No longer used - -
12. Number of items added to KS Government Information Library C 6,934 4,453 4,134 4,500 4,605 7,605 10,605
13. Total cost for online databases for legislative and state agency use A $58,139 $64,300 $65,734 $67,536 $64,235 $66,162 $68,147

_

Statewide Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the Statewide Services program was not funded, more than 400,000 books in digital format become unavailable or inaccessible. Library circulation statewide decreases by nearly over 715,000 transactions. Teachers, students, instructors, parents, researchers, business and industry, along with the general public would lose access to resources searched over 135 million times in FY 2022. Most local libraries would be unable to provide a fraction of the lost information due to the much lower price of statewide purchase (cost avoidance estimate $83,515,399). Additionally, Kansans would be severely limited in their access to library materials other than those held locally. 733,000 requests to borrow titles from cooperating libraries would go unfilled. Timely delivery of materials would suffer should the library courier service not be maintained at current levels.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: - Act of March 4, 1899, ch. 163, 1899 Kan. Sess. Laws 327 (creating Kansas traveling libraries commission). Empowered the State Library to proactively support the reading and informational needs of the public statewide. KSA 75-2575 through 75-2586, directs the State Library to encourage interlibrary cooperation. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Make reading materials available to all Kansans.

B. Provide reliable and relevant e-content.

Program History

This program carries out the statutory and mission-based obligation to enhance and expand the quality of library service across the state, for all potential library users, and through both direct-to-user services and materials/services shared with local libraries.

It is considered to be authorized by the Act of March 4, 1899, and expanded to include partnership with libraries of all types by KSA 75-2575 through 75-2686, both cited above.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cost per search, statewide research databases B $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01
2. Digital book collections - total circulation A 712,620 755,809 714,158 735,583 742,383 779,502 818,477
3. Total interlibrary items loaned by Kansas libraries annually (Calendar Year) A 772,663 577,293 716,335 774,000 713,588 749,267 786,731
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Digital book collections - patron accounts A 76,507 22,392 50,349 53,400 58,758 61,696 64,781
5. Total searches, statewide research databases B 134,726,678 134,389,300 136,333,752 151,330,000 130,632,463 137,164,086 144,022,290
6. Total sessions, learning modules B 113,459 118,249 91,530 105,000 93,388 98,057 102,960

_

Talking Books


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the Talking Books program wasn't funded, Kansans with print disabilities (blindness, visual impairment, physical impairment, reading disabilities) would lose access to an accessible library of over 120,000 audio and braille materials that support lifelong learning, cultural engagement, and entertainment.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: - 75-2534 9(c) For the benefit of blind readers of Kansas, the state library may make available books and other reading matter in Braille, talking books or any other medium of reading used by the blind. To this end, the state library is authorized to provide library services for the blind and other handicapped persons through contract, agreement or otherwise with the library of congress or any regional library thereof. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide reading materials in an accessible format to eligible Kansas residents.

B. Provides personalized library support to eligible Kansas residents.

C. Produce specialized reading material by Kansas authors or about Kansas for users of the Talking Books Program.

Program History

Kansas Talking Books (KTB) provides personalized library support and materials in an accessible format to eligible Kansas residents to ensure that all may read. This library service features audio books, audio magazines, braille books, braille magazines, and playback equipment mailed directly to patrons and returned postage free. The division staff also provide personalized reference and reader advisory support. Patrons have access to the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) service through the web or via mobile app at no-cost. Starting in 1940, the State Department of Social Welfare Division of Services for the Blind contracted braille and talking book services for eligible Kansans through the Wolfner Library in Missouri. The Funding for Talking Books as a divsion of the State Library of Kansas was approved in the Govenor's Budget for FY 1970. KTB was established as a regional network library of the Library of Congress's National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled in July 1970. Subregional libraries were established in Manhattan, Hays, Hutchinson, Dodge City, Kansas City, & Wichita, providing direct service to Talking Book patrons in their service areas with administrative and material support provided by the regional library in Topeka. Over the years, subregionals were also located in Great Bend, Topeka, & Norton. The regional library moved from Topeka to Emporia in July 1983. In 2009, Kansas Talking Books began circulating materials on digital talking book cartridges with digital talking book machines to replace the cassette collection. By 2012, all subregional libraries were closed and statewide circulation operations were consolidated to the regional library in Emporia. Contracts for outreach services with NWKLS, SWKLS, CKLS, and SEKLS were establish and remain in place. In 2020, KTB began shifiting to a Download on Demand circulation model, providing access to every title in the NLS collection to patrons on demand.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Children served during FY A 38 26 24 29 39 42 45
2. Cost Per Item Circulated A $2.08 $2.20 $1.71 $2.24 $2.08 $2.16 $2.15
3. Number of BARD users A 643 635 645 670 534 555 578
4. Number of talking book machine and accessories circulated A 1,376 1,239 1,320 1,300 1,233 1,245 1,258
5. Number of titles circulated by staff A 145,443 138,723 248,922 190,000 208,095 210,176 212,278
6. Patron downloads A 55,891 55,319 65,381 66,000 65,448 68,066 70,789
7. Phone/email contacts (Emporia, Norton, Great Bend, Dodge City, Iola) B 27,351 25,290 22,413 24,000 20,019 18,618 17,874
8. Schools served during FY A 162 161 164 167 164 166 168
9. Total Active Talking Book Users Served A 5,015 4,870 4,857 4,900 4,487 4,532 4,577
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
10. Children's material available A 17,372 18,229 19,312 20,500 20,222 21,233 22,300
11. Children's material circulated A 5,959 5,668 12,640 8,000 8,590 8,785 9,049
12. Digital books produced C 35 15 23 23 40 30 30
13. DTB titles available A 101,605 108,260 116,940 124,000 124,017 131,460 139,350
14. Locally Produced Kansas Titles in the collection C 903 910 927 950 952 967 982
15. Presentations/Contacts (Emporia, Norton, Great Bend, Dodge City, Iola) B 2,419 478 967 1,200 2,151 2,200 2,275

Board of Regents

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Decreased higher education coordination; inability to collect and analyze data; decreased higher education strategic vision for Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
The Kansas Board of Regents established in Article 6 of the Constitution of the State of Kansas. Kansas statutes establishes the powers, duties and administration of the Board of Regents in Chapter 74, Article 32. Discretionary Yes 3

Program Goals

A. Provide effective and efficient staff support to the Board of Regents, Technical Education Authority, and the postsecondary education institutions they govern and coordinate.

Program History

In addition to staff support for the Board of Regents and Technical Education Authority, this program provides office administration of academic programs, career technical education, regulation of private and out-of-state institutions, student financial aid, federal programs, data and planning, facilities planning, and financing/funding of the state's 32 public colleges and universities. The most recent change to the Board office administration occurred with the passage of SB 345 in 1999, creating the Kansas Higher Education Coordination Act (KSA 74-3201a), bringing all public higher education institutions under the supervision of the Board.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of Board goals completed A 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
2. Percentage of agency administrative costs of total budget - 3% 2.1% 2.6% 2.5% .0270% 2.1% 2%
3. Systemwide data collection tracking, analysis expenditures - 1,368,325 1,382,109 1,492,104 152,500 1,058,112 1,564,430 1,640,261
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Student financial assistance
applications processed
A 4,818 5,357 5,922 7,000 8,611 10,543 11,582
5. Systemwide transfer courses in
Kansas public higher education
A 91 100 108 114 116 126 137

_

Postsecondary Education Institutions


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Kansas public postsecondary education institutions would not have the available state funds to meet goals of educating Kansans. The cost of attending a Kansas public postsecondary education institution would increase for families, which could decrease the number of citizens earning credentials to meet workforce demands across the state. Funding for the program also has a direct impact on the Board's Strategic Plan: Building a Future and the ability to reach the goals within the plan.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
The Kansas Board of Regents established in Article 6 of the Constitution of the State of Kansas. Kansas statutes establishes the powers, duties and administration of the Board of Regents in Chapter 74, Article 32. Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A.Helping Kansas Families: aims to ensure that higher education remains affordable and accessible to Kansans, while continuing to help graduates achieve success.

B. Supporting Kansas Businesses: focuses on the advantages higher education can provide to Kansas businesses in the development of a talent pipeline.

Program History

This program comprises various appropriations and funding sources for the state's 32 public postsecondary institutions, including state universities, Washburn University, community colleges and technical colleges. The program was most significantly impacted with the passage of the Higher Education Coordination Act (KSA 74-3201a).

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. University Engineering Initiative
expenditure per degree awarded
B 6,184 6,538 6,200 6,500 7,374 7,514 7,657
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
2. Attainment: credentials awarded
systemwide
A 43,939 42,936 42,801 43,000 43,028 43,256 43,485
3. Excel in CTE credit hours B 109,226 98,681 105,510 106,000 115,517 118,605 121,775
Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Percent of students taking 30
credit hours per year
A 54.1% 54.5% 54.4% 54.5% 51.7% 51.1% 50.5%

_

Student Financial Assistance


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Decreased funding available for scholarships and grants awarded to students attending Kansas higher education institutions, which would increase the cost of attendance and decrease the number of students able to afford postsecondary education and attain a credential.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Each scholarship has specific statutory language. Discretionary No 2

Program Goals

A. Award scholarships to students in order to increase affordability of attending postsecondary education.

Program History

This program includes all state sponsored student financial assistance programs available to Kansas residents attending both public and independent higher education institutions. It has developed and changed over the years as new scholarship programs are created and revised.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Applicant to Recipient Ratio A 2.4 2.4 2 2 2.3 2.17 2.28
2. Applications processed A 4,818 5,357 5,922 7,000 8,611 10,543 11,582
3. Average award per scholarship
recipient
A 1,974 2,133 2,855 4,380 3,619 4,296 5,100
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Scholarship Recipients A 12,365 11,303 12,944 15,000 19,790 22,842 26,364
5. Students in Repayment Status - 238 236 220 220 236 238 240

Kansas State School for the Blind

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Inability to maintain services to students, violation of Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 76-1101b Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Increase school enrollment

B. Improve school climate

C. Improve operational efficiencies and maximize resources allocated to student services

Program History

KSSB was established in 1867 and is a trusted source of information and expertise related to vision services for school districts and blind students across the state. The administration provides leadership to ensure that the agency's resources are aligned with its vision and goals.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent budget for Instructional Services C 70% 75% 77% 74% 75% 78% 79%
2. Student access to intensive services A - 40 40 45 0.2 0.25 0.35
3. Teacher-Staff retention rate B - 90% 95% 90% 90% 85% 95%

_

Instructional Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Student Individual Education Plan (IEP) services disrupted, violation of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 76-1101b Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Increase outreach services to infants and young children who are Blind/VI across Kansas.

B. Increase students 0-21 who are Blind/VI across Kansas receiving direct instructional contact from KSSB.

Program History

KSSB promotes equal access for all children who are blind, low vision or deaf-blind in Kansas' schools. The campus program serves elementary through high school and transition students. Field Services works with local districts to maximize resources and personnel to serve students with qualified staff throughout the state.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Students 0-5 receiving direct services - 35 40 40 50 No Longer Used No Longer Used No Longer Used
2. Number of Low Vision Examinations provided to students ages 3-21 who are blind in Kansas, yearly - 150 200 83 - 85 90 95
3. Total students served - - 240 - 150 No Longer Used No Longer Used No Longer Used
Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of students ages 3-21 who received services from KSSB vison teachers (new measure) - - - - - 750 775 825
5. Students 0-3 receiving direct services (new measure) - - - - - 45 55 100

_

Support Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Student Individual Education Plan (IEP) services disrupted, violation of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 76-1101b Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Safe and secure environment for students and professionals that provide specialized education.

B. Provide and support technology on campus for specialized educational needs of students.

C. Maintain safe vehicle fleet to transport students to off-campus academic classes, extracurricular activities.

Program History

Focus of Support Services is to make sure students have safe and secure facilities for delivery of high-quality educational services. In 2012 the closure commission recommended combining Administration/Support Services with KSSD to achieve efficiencies. All departments within Support Services share supervisory employees with KSSD. Additional staff members provide support on either campus as needed to further promote savings.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. IT resources for direct classroom - 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
2. Security services meet standards - 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9
3. Average mileage per vehicle in fleet - 85,000 75,000 33,211 36,000 30,191 33,529 36,000

Kansas State School for the Deaf

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Inability to maintain services to students, violation of Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) and violation of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 76-1001b Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Advance agency's mission, vision and core values by assuring quality services are provided to internal and external community members

B. Promote safe, healthy environment for employees to gain satisfaction from their contributions to agency mission

Program History

KSSD is an accredited school established in 1861 and committed to educating Deaf/Hard of Hearing students. It serves as a center-based educational option to provide a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment (most accessible). KSSD also has an Outreach department to serve as a statewide resource center for families and students served in their local school districts.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Increase dual endorsement staff - 76% 83% 74% 75% 75% 76% 76%
2. Increase job satisfaction to 90% - 89% 84% 81% 85% 85% 85% 85%

_

Instructional Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Student Individual Education Plan (IEP) services disrupted, violation of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, (IDEA).

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 1001b Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Increase student enrollment at campus-based program

B. Increase direct and indirect support for students and families

C. Administer language assessment assessments to at least 50 students each year through LAP

Program History

Instructional Services operates both a campus-centered program and outreach services which serve children aged birth through 21 years old. It includes a Student Life program for those who live too far from KSSD to attend as a day student. Student Life includes language immersion, social emotional development, homework and tutoring support and access to extracurricular activities.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Students receiving LAP services under KSA 75-5397e C 45 62 56 68 55 56 56
2. Increase enrollment on campus - 148 154 150 155 148 153 153
3. Increase students served - 453 537 658 671 756 767 767
4. Increase students age 3-8 receiving LAP service C 19 40 73 85 85 85 85

_

Support Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Student Individual Education Plan (IEP) services disrupted, violation of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, (IDEA).

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 1001b Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Safe and secure environment for students and professionals that provide specialized education

B. Provide and support technology on campus for specialized educational needs of students

C. Maintain safe vehicle fleet to transport students to off-campus academic classes, extracurricular activities

Program History

Focus of Support Services is to make sure students have safe and secure facilities for delivery of high-quality educational services. In 2012 the closure commission recommended combining Administration/Support Services with KSSB to achieve efficiencies. All departments within Support Services share supervisory employees with KSSB. Additional staff members provide support on either campus as needed to further promote savings.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. IT resources for direct classroom support B 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
2. Security services meet standards A 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9
3. Average mileage per vehicle in fleet C 85,000 75,000 33,211 36,000 126,341 132,000 137,000

Kansas State Department of Education

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the Administration program wasn't funded, the ability of KSDE to do the following would either be diminished or eliminated: process/audit state and federal aid payments to school districts; license teachers; accredit school districts; accredit teacher preparation programs; collect data from school districts; respond to requests for information from the Legislature and Governor; follow federal and state regulations for procurement; recruit and hire staff; comply with federal and state employment laws; and communicate to all public and nonpublic schools in Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: –KSA 72-5170 (school district accreditation) Specific –KSA 72-1250–2167 (teacher licensure) Specific –KSA 72-5131–5176 (audit state aid payments) Specific –KSA 72-1167 (USD budgets) Specific –KSA 72-5131–5176 (process state aid) General –Uniform Grant Guidance General –State purchasing regulations General –KSA 72-1167 (post USD budgets) General –KSA 72-2171 (USD accountability reports) Specific –National and Community Service Act of 1990 Specific –Serve America Act of 2002 Mandatory No 8

Program Goals

A. Access and distribute state and federal revenues to local education agencies and other qualifying organizations.

B. To verify the fiscal accountability of all USDs, special education interlocals, cooperatives, service centers, child care centers, and non-public entities.

C. Ensure Kansas educators are qualified and prepared to improve the learning of Kansas students.

D. To ensure that all educational systems in Kansas achieve Kansas Education Systems Accreditation (FY 2018 was the first year of KESA).

E. Continue the development and enhancement of web-based applications for seamless communication and exchange of information with customers and funding agencies.

F. Utilize federal SLDS grant to maximize standardization of data, increase interoperability of systems and modernize overall P20W SLDS capabilities.

Program History

This program provides legal, human resource, communication, school finance, accounting, budgeting, purchasing, auditing, information technology, research, and legislative services to the entire agency. Additionally, it oversees the licensing of educators and accreditation of education systems in Kansas. These services have long existed in the Kansas State Department of Education and its predecessor agencies. However, certain services have become more important over time. In particular, information technology services have increased in importance as KSDE collects more data and operates more web-based applications.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Deployment of a statewide student information system or comparable platform F 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.75 0.4 100 100
2. Percent of educator program standards that have completed the comprehensive revision process and have been approved by KSBE C 75% 77.5% 80% 90% No longer used - -
3. Percent of assignments filled by fully licensed educators C 95% 95% 93.2% 93% 92.7% 93% 93%
4. Total amount of state aid savings generated by KSDE fiscal auditing B $18,645,980 $22,562,435 $30,113,406 $18,820,000 $37,831,260 $24,350,000 $24,350,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Number of accredited systems in Kansas under KESA (cumulative) D 51 79 173 360 324 360 342
6. Number of new teachers being supported by multi-year approved mentoring support C 4,513 4,829 5,184 5,000 5,038 5,000 5,000
7. Number of state and federal aid payments distributed, excluding the Children's Cabinet A - - 48,372 - 48,775 46,000 46,000
8. Number of web-enabled applications maintained by KSDE E 93 95 109 109 110 110 109
9. Total number of licenses issued per year (new measure) C 20,570 24,551 26,976 27,000 27,390 27,000 27,000

_

Career and Technical Education


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Not funding the Career and Technical Education program would limit the amount of CTE courses available to students in Kansas middle and high schools, which would make Kansas graduate less prepared to enter a highly technical labor market. Additionally, eliminating or reducing State funding would place federal funding at risk.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific:– Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (20 USC 2301, et seq.) Specific – KSA 72-3810, et seq. Mandatory Yes 6

Program Goals

A. Provide technical assistance and support to local school districts to ensure every middle school and high school student has an Individual Plan of Study in place and is engaged in a quality career pathway leading to success in postsecondary education or in the workforce.

Program History

In 1917, Congress enacted the Smith-Hughes Act which authorized federal funds for the establishment and support of secondary and postsecondary vacational training in agriculture, home economics, and trade and industry. The 1985 Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act aimed to expand, improve, modernize, and develop quality vocational education programs to meet the needs of the workforce and promote economic growth, as well as meet the needs of specific populations, including handicapped and disadvantaged individuals. The Perkins Act was reauthorized in 2018 and now allows school districts to use federal funds to provide all students, not just those enrolled in CTE courses, career exploration and development activities. Since July 1, 2004, the Kansas Board of Regents has served as the lead agency for the Perkins Grant. Funding is split eveningly between KBOR and KSDE.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of high school students enrolled in tuition-free college, career, and technical education courses A 13,934 12,529 13,000 13,500 Not available until Feb. 2024 13,800 14,000
2. Percent of middle and high school students that have developed IPS (new measure) A 97% 100% 100% 100% No longer used - -
3. Percent of middle school and high school IPS that meet level of quality standards: Course Mapped to Interests (new measure) A - - 86% - 86% 87% 88%
4. Percent of middle school and high school IPS that meet level of quality standards: Exportable, Electronic Portfolio (new measure) A - - 75% - 77% 77% 78%
5. Percent of middle school and high school IPS that meet level of quality standards: Postsecondary Plan (new measure) A - - 82% - 82% 82% 83%
6. Percent of middle school and high school IPS that meet level of quality standards: Relating Academic/Interests Assessment to Career A - - 96% - 94% 95% 95%
7. Number of CTE career clusters/pathway programs meeting standards and implemented at the local level A 3,245 3,415 3,493 3,482 3,501 3,577 3,590
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
8. Number of CTE students who have earned at least two credits in an approved CTE career cluster/pathway course sequence A 29,920 26,187 26,250 26,500 No longer used - -
9. Number of students participating in CTE organizations A 23,441 23,441 23,657 23,800 24,816 24,850 24,900

_

Child Nutrition and Wellness


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Failure to fund the Child Nutrition and Wellness program would be the loss of approximately $200 million in annual federal funding for school nutrition programs. As a result, children who depend on school nutrition programs for meals would no longer have access to free or reduced price meals.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – 42 USC 1751-1761, 1762a, 1765, 1766, 1772, 1773, 1776, 1779 Mandatory Yes 5

Program Goals

A. Sponsors provide participants with nutritious, appealing meals.

B. Sponsors comply with federal and state requirements; operate efficient and effective programs; and receive reimbursement for meals and snacks served.

C. Sponsors increase participants' awareness of the benefits of choosing nutritious foods.

Program History

The Child Nutrition and Wellness program administers several programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that provide health food to children including the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, Child and Adult Care Food Program, and several others. The National School Lunch Program was authorized in 1946 and the School Breakfast Program was made permanent in 1975, with other programs following. State law provides for state aid for school lunches, which is a match required under federal law.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of KS elementary students who participated in the Body Venture health education exhibit C 6.41% 0.0% 2% 10% 0.0% 10% 10%
2. Percent of programs that follow federal regulations and guidance B 99.6% 99.3% 99.9% 99% 99.9% 99% 99%
3. Average reimbursement for each meal/snack served B $2.159,585,272 $3.105,772,496 $3.82 $3.16 $2.71 $2.70 $2.70
4. Number of meals/snacks served to participants in Child Nutrition Programs A 87,060,622 83,177,067 96,987,146 95,000,000 89,148,579 92,550,000 92,550,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Percent of sponsors that had an administrative review and procurement review conducted by KSDE B 38% 31% 38% 30% 40% 30% 30%
6. Amount of reimbursement processed through KSDE's KN-CLAIM application A $188,014,837 $258,329,047 $370,331,242 $300,000,000 $241,912,467 $250,000,000 $250,000,000
7. Number of Body Venture site visits C 52 0 0 75 0 75 75

_

Financial Aid


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Failure to fund the Financial Aid program would result in school districts not having the funding to effectively operate and educate Kansas students.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – KSA 72-5131–5176 (KSEEA) Specific – KSA 72-53,126 (Capital Outlay) Specific – KSA 72-5462 (Capital Improvement) Specific – KSA 72-3422, 72-3425, & 72-3440 (SPED) Specific – KSA 72-17,132–17,148 (Food Service) Specific – KSA 72-4161–4166 (Parents as Teachers) Specific– KSA 72-4005–4010 (Driver Education) Specific – KSA 72-1173 (Juvenile Detention Facilities) Specific – Elementary and Secondary Education Act Specific – Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Specific – 42 USC 1751-1779 Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. To provide financial support that will assist local education agencies in meeting the educational needs of students.

Program History

The distribution of state aid has always been the responsibility of the Department of Education or its predecessor agencies. The amount of state aid distributed has been significantly impacted by legislative changes and court challenges. Major school finance formulas have included the State Foundation Aid of 1965; School District Equalization Act of 1972; School District Finance and Quality Performance Act of 1992; Classroom Learning Assuring Student Success Act of 2015; and the Kansas School Equity and Enhancement Act of 2017. Signficant court challenges include Mock v. State of Kansas, USD 229 v. State of Kansas, Montoy v. State of Kansas, and Gannon v. State of Kansas. Additionally, KSDE has distributed the vast majority of federal aid to school districts since 1947, which is when the Legislature authorized school districts to participate in the National School Lunch Program. Other major federal aid programs include Title I and special education funding. Performance measures for the Financial Aid program are those identified for KSDE's other programs, excluding those for the Kansas Children's Cabinet. Accurately implementing the Financial Aid program assists these programs in meeting their performance measures.


_

Governance of Education


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The constitutionally proscribed State Board of Education would not be able to carry out its duties to provide general supervision of the State's K-12 educational interests.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – KSA 72-243–72-263 Mandatory No 7

Program Goals

A. Kansas leads the world in the success of each student.

B. Provide an effective educator in every classroom.

C. Develop active communication and partnerships with families, communities, business stakeholders, constituents, and policy partners.

Program History

Article 6 of the Kansas Constitution provides for the Kansas State Board of Education. The State Board consists of 10 elected members, each representing a district comprised of four contiguous senatorial districts. Board members serve four-year terms with an overlapping schedule. Every other year, the State Board reorganizes to elect a chairman and vice-chairman. The State Board appoints a Commissioner of Education who serves as its executive director. The Kansas State Board of Education was created to replace the position of the Kansas State Superintendent of Public Instruction effective January 14, 1969.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the ELA assessment A 0.0% 35% 32% 35% 33% 35% 37%
2. Percent of students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the math assessment A 0.0% 28% 29% 34% 31% 34% 38%
3. Percent of students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the science assessment A 0.0% 35% 31% 35% 31% 35% 38%
4. Percent of educator program standards that have completed the comprehensive revision process and have been approved by KSBE B 75% 77.5% 80% 90% No longer used - -
5. Percent of assignments filled by fully licensed educators B 95% 95% 93.2% 93% 92.7% 93% 93%
6. Five-year postsecondary effectiveness rate A 48.3% 50% 51.5% 52% 51% 54% 55%
7. High school graduation rate A 88.3% 88.1% 89.3% 90% Not available 90.5% 91%
8. Number of educator vacancies reported by USDs A 648 839 1,381 1,500 1,637 1,550 1,500
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
9. Statewide dropout rate A 1.3% 1.7% 1.4% 1.6% Not available 1% 1%
10. Total number of licenses issued per year B 20,570 24,551 26,976 27,000 27,390 27,000 27,000

_

Kansas Children's Cabinet


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Failure to fund the Kansas Children's Cabinet would result in a reduction or elimination of services to Kansas families and children in a variety of areas, including child abuse and neglect prevention, early childhood education, mental and behavioral health screening, training for parents and health care providers, and access to healthcare.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – KSA 38-2103 Mandatory Yes N/A

Program Goals

A. The Children's Cabinet will develop and implement a coordinated, comprehensive delivery system to improve the health and well-being of families and children in Kansas and evaluate programs funded with Children's Initiatives Funds.

Program History

In 1980, Kansas was the first state to establish a special fund, the Kansas Family and Children Trust Fund, dedicated to the prevention of child abuse and neglect by funding community-based prevention programs. In 1992, the Legislature created the Corporation for Change, which was given the responsibility for administering the Children's Trust Fund. In 1998, the Corporation for Change was replaced by the Governor's Advisory Committee on Children and Families. In 1999, the Governor's Advisory Committee on Children and Families was abolished and the Children's Cabinet was created. The Children's Cabinet was tasked with advising the Governor and Legislature on how best to use the tobacco Master Settlement Agreement moneys credited to the Children's Initiatives Fund and to assist the Governor in developing a coordinated, comprehensive system to serve children and families in Kansas. From its creation through June 30, 2016, the Department of Social and Rehabilitative Services and the Department for Children and Families served as the fiscal agent for the Children's Cabinet. Since July 1, 2016, the Kansas State Department of Education has served as the Cabinet's fiscal agent.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of classrooms funded by Communities Aligned in Early Development and Education meeting high quality standards for classroom instructions for Pre-K Classrooms A 35% 14% - - No longer used - -
2. Percent of classrooms funded by Communities Aligned in Early Development and Education meeting high quality standards for classroom instructions for Toddler Classrooms A 55% 44% 47% - No longer used - -
3. Percent of classrooms funded by the Early Childhood Block Grant meeting high quality standards for classroom instruction for Toddler Classrooms A 59% 75% 78% - 82% - -
4. Percent of classrooms funded by the Early Childhood Block Grant meeting high quality standards for classroom standards for Pre-K Classrooms A 62% 72% 76% - 75% - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Percent of providers funded by the Child Care Quality Initiative meeting high-quality standards at initial assessment (new measure) A 42% 45% 65% - No longer used - -
6. Number of children receiving services through the Child Care Quality Initiative A 527 484 443 - No longer used - -
7. Number of children served through CAEDE programs A 653 511 937 - No longer used - -
8. Number of children served through ECGB programs A 7,163 6,074 6,719 - 7,062 - -
9. Number of professionals receiving professional development through the Autism Diagnosis Program A 91 62 95 - No longer used - -
10. Percent of eligible children participating in the Dolly Parton Imagination Library A - - - - 28% - -

_

Special Education Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Failure to fund the Special Education Services program would diminish the amount of support and assistance KSDE can provide to students in special education programs throughout Kansas. Additionally, failure by the State to provide necessary services opens up the State to legal consequences, including court orders and the loss of federal funding.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Specific – KSA 72-3403, et seq. Mandatory Yes 2

Program Goals

A. Provide leadership, technical assistance, and financial support to local education agencies to ensure high-quality special education programs and success for all students with disabilities.

B. To support local agencies providing early learning opportunities and to collaboratively strengthen early childhood services in Kansas so that each student enters kindergarten at age five socially, emotionally, and academically prepared for success.

C. Assist local education agencies in employing highly-qualified teachers, administrators, and support staff.

Program History

A special education division was created in the State Department of Public Instruction (the predecessor to KSDE) in 1949. The first appropriations for financing special education classes were made in 1951. In 1975, Congress passed the Education for all Handicapped Children Act (EHA) in order to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to a free and appropriate education. In addition, financial assistance to state was authorized to allow compliance with the new law. Congress has periodically updated and reauthorized the law to improve the structure of supports and accountability. In 1990, the EHA was reauthorized and the title changed to the Individuals with Disabilites Education Act (IDEA). The most recent reauthorization of the IDEA was in 2004. The Kansas Special Education for Exceptional Children Act was passed in 1974. The state law largely mirrors the IDEA, but also includes gifted students and children enrolled in private schools as students eligible to receive a free and appropriate public education. This program also oversees all early childhood education programs administered by KSDE.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of preschool-aged children aged 3 through 5 with IEPs who demonstrate improved acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early literacy) B 89% 90% 88% 89% 89% 88% 87%
2. Percent of students with disabilities enrolled in higher education or some other postsecondary education or training program, or employed within one year A 75% 75.6% 73.4% 76.6% 77% 79% 79%
3. Percent of students with disabilities graduating from high school A 78.4% 80% 78.4% 84.5% 84% 81% 82%
4. Percent of students with disabilities scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the math assessment: 4th grade A - 13.5% 16.36% 17.5% 16% 17% 20%
5. Percent of students with disabilities scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the math assessment: 8th grade A - 5.1% 5.56% 7.5% 6% 7% 9%
6. Percent of students with disabilities scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the math assessment: High school A - 4% 3.6% 6% 5% 6% 7%
7. Percent of students with disabilities scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the reading assessment: 4th grade
A - 22.8% 19.48% 22% 19% 22% 23%
8. Percent of students with disabilities scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the reading assessment: 8th grade
A - 7.6% 5.69% 7.5% 6% 7% 11%
9. Percent of students with disabilities scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the reading assessment: High school
A - 6.7% 4.95% 8.5% 6% 6% 7%
10. Total number of children enrolled in preschool in public school districts B 23,421 20,148 22,579 23,600 23,785 24,700 25,700
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
11. Number of agencies participating in students performance technical assistance and training events sponsored by TASN A 317 348 421 434 392 403 415
12. Number of attendees participating in student performance technical assistance and training events sponsored by TASN A 7,917 14,429 19,362 19,942 14,432 14,864 15,309
13. Number of positions filled through the use of the Kansas Education Employment Board C 215 144 120 130 344 360 370
14. Number of technical assistance and training events sponsored by TASN to improve student performance and outcomes A 438 591 839 864 972 1,001 1,031
15. Number of USDs with approved preschool-aged at-risk programs B 226 244 255 262 265 268 270

_

Standards and Assessments


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Failure to fund the Standards and Assessments program would result in KSDE not being able to develop and implement the state assessments and academic standards required by both state and federal law.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: – Every Student Succeeds Act Specific – KSA 72-5170(b) Specific – KSA 72-5170(c) Mandatory No 3

Program Goals

A. Provide the resources educators need to ensure that Kansas graduates have the academic and cognitive preparations, technical and employability skills, and civic engagement experiences to be successful in (1) postsecondary education, (2) the attainment of an industry-recognized certification, or (3) the workforce, without the need for remediation.

Program History

State History: In the 1980s, a state minimum competency law existed that required all schools in Kansas to participate in a minimum competency testing program in reading and mathematics developed by the University of Kansas. Beginning in 1992, the state law has required the State Board of Education to establish curriculum standards for mathematics, science, ready, writing, and social studies and to develop statewide assessments in those core subjects. State assessments must be administered at three grade levels, as determined by the State Board of Education.

Federal History: The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) was originally pased as part of President Lyndon Johnson's broader anti-poverty initiative. The Improving America's Schools Act (IASA) attempted to coordinate federal resources.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the ELA assessment A 0.0% 35% 32% 35% 33% 35% 37%
2. Percent of students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the math assessment A 0.0% 28% 29% 34% 31% 34% 38%
3. Percent of students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on the science assessment A 0.0% 35% 31% 35% 31% 35% 38%
4. Five-year postsecondary effectiveness rate A 48.3% 50% 51.5% 52% 51% 54% 55%
5. Five-year postsecondary success rate A 55.9% 55.7% 59% 60% 58% 61% 62%
6. High school graduation rate A 88.3% 88.1% 89.3% 90% Not available 90.5% 91%
7. SGF cost per assessment administered A - $1.39 $1.16 $1.07 $1.10 $1.03 $0.99
8. Total cost per assessment administered A - $5.97 $4.96 $4.60 $4.73 $4.40 $4.24
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
9. Number of ELA, math, and science assessments administered A - 487,388 581,715 605,000 583,280 605,000 605,000
10. Total number of state interim assessments administered (regular and predictive) A 544,540 518,155 627,662 700,000 685,204 760,000 810,000

_

Title Programs and Services


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Reductions or elimination in funding for the Title Programs and Services program would significantly reduce supplemental supports and assistance to Kansas students, including to subgroups

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Specific: - Elementary and Secondary Education Act (20 USC 6301, et seq.) Mandatory Yes 4

Program Goals

A. Provide leadership, technical assistance, and financial support to local education agencies to ensure the success of all at-risk and special population students.

Program History

Congress passed the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in 1965 to provide supplemental assistance to local school districts to support the academic success of low-income children (Title I, Part A). Since enactment, the ESEA has been expanded to include a variety of other at-risk students, including English-language learners (Title III, Part A), students in rural areas (Title IV, Part B), migrant students (Title I, Part C), and neglected and delinquent youth (Title I, Part D). Additionally, ESEA provides funds to train and recruit high-quality teachers (Title II, Part A), funds Student Support and Enrichment Grants (Title IV, Part A), and funds 21st Century Community Learning Grants (Title IV, Part B). All of this federal grant funding is expended through KSDE's Financial Aid program, but the grants are administered by the Title Programs and Services program.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of English-language learner students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: ELA A 0.0% 6% 5% 7% 5% 7% 10%
2. Percent of English-language learner students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: Math
A 0.0% 6% 7% 10% 8% 10% 12%
3. Percent of homeless students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: ELA
A 0.0% 18% 15% 19% 15% 16% 17%
4. Percent of homeless students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: Math
A 0.0% 11% 11% 16% 13% 14% 15%
5. Percent of economically disadvantaged students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: ELA
A - 21.1% 19% 21% 20.3% 23% 25%
6. Percent of economically disadvantaged students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: Math
A - 14.8% 15.73% 19% 17.8% 21% 24%
7. Percent of migrant students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: ELA
A - 13.6% 11.76% 15% 10.03% 12.5% 13%
8. Percent of migrant students scoring in levels 3 & 4 on state assessments: Math
A - 9.1% 11.09% 13% 10.17% 12% 12.5%
9. Percent of students who graduate from high school: Economically disadvantaged
A 81.2% 81% 82.2% 83% Not available 83% 83%
10. Percent of students who graduate from high school: English Learners
A 83.7% 82.6% 84.4% 84% Not available 85% 86%
11. Percent of students who graduate from high school: Homeless
A 68.3% 68.8% 71.5% 72% Not available 72% 72%
12. Percent of students who graduate from high school: Migrant
A 78.3% 81.4% 85.1% 84% Not available 85% 86%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
13. Number of contacts made by TASN staff to local agencies and school districts with the purpose of assisting in improving student academic performance A 1,570 1,779 3,380 3,481 4,637 3,481 3,585
14. Number of technical assistance resources for teachers made available through TASN A 2,146 2,353 2,562 2,638 2,707 2,638 2,718

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

Abstracters' Board of Examiners

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Consequences of not funding this program would be that there would be no regulation of or licensing of abstracters in Kansas, nor examinations for abstracters in Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 58-2801 et seq.; KSA 74-3901 et seq. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To continue to keep the active businesses licensed.

B. To promote getting new individuals licensed as Abstracters in Kansas.

C. To improve awareness of the value of an Abstract.

Program History

The Abstracters' Board of Examiners was created by the 1941 Legislature (KSA 74-3901 et seq.) to administer the Kansas Abstracters' Act (KSA 58-2801 et seq.). The Act provides for regulation of individuals and firms that compile and sell abstracts of Kansas real estate.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cost per License A, B $75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75
2. Number of Business Licenses Issued A 178 172 172 172 164 165 165
3. Number of Employee Licenses Issued B 192 196 181 185 183 185 185
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Business License Revenue A 13,350 12,900 12,900 12,900 12,300 12,375 12,375
5. Employee License Revenue B 14,400 14,700 13,575 13,875 13,725 13,875 13,875

Board of Accountancy

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Not funding this program would result in the inability for persons to become certified public accountants in Kansas; further resulting in no oversight with compliance of the laws and regulations; and the public's inability to rely on financial reports issued solely by CPAs.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Licensing: KSA1-201; 1-202; 1-204; 1-205; KSA 1-302; 1-302a; 1-307; 1-308; 1-310; 1-315; 1-316; KSA 1-501 Enforcement: KSA 1-205; 1-206; KSA 1-311; 1-312; 1-316; 1-318; 1-319; KSA 1-401 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To approve applications for certificates by exam and reciprocity to those who meet minimum qualifying requirements.

B. To approve applications for permits to practice who meet an experience requirement and to reinstate permits to those who meet certain CE requirements.

C. To register in-state and out-of-state CPA firms practicing in the state of Kansas.

D. Enforcement: Regulate CPAs and the services provided relating to the practice of certified public accountancy.

Program History

The Board was initially created in 1915 with a "Board of Examiners" as a part of the Business Administration Department of the University of Kansas. Only three CPA certificates were issued that year. In its present form, the "Board of Accountancy" was created in 1952. In 1970, the Board became autonomous from the University and its offices moved to Topeka. A full-time Executive was hired to replace the part-time faculty CPA who had served as the official "Board Secretary" and the school of business clerical personnel who performed the duties of the Board. The new Executive was also designated as the official Board Secretary, as well as being the Executive Agency Head. In 1973, a Baccalaureate degree was a "concentration in accounting" defined by the Board, became the minimum requirement to take the national CPA exam to become a CPA. The Board was authorized to require continuing professional education as a requirement to renew or reinstate a permit to practice. In 2009, legislation was passed to allow out of state CPAs, without a physical presence in this State, to practice under mobility, without the need to obtain a certificate and permit.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Total number of Certificates A 12,934 13,059 13,205 13,331 13,347 13,438 13,539
2. Total number of Complaints Filed D 97 95 95 95 105 100 100
3. Total number of CPA Firms C 845 828 836 842 810 799 808
4. Total number of Permit Holders B 3,813 3,841 3,812 3,741 3,760 3,687 3,671
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Total number of Hearings Held D 66 64 48 65 65 62 65
6. Total number of New Certification Holders A 116 141 146 126 172 91 101
7. Total number of New CPA Firms C 56 47 49 47 44 45 45
8. Total number of New Permits B 125 126 150 126 172 91 101

Kansas Human Rights Commission

_

Compliance


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Discrimination, segregation or separation, and loss of equal opportunities in employment, housing, and public accommodations. Parties to the complaint do not have an administrative remedy to resolve allegations of discrimination.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 44-1005 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide prompt, professional and appropriate services to all citizens who contact the agency for assistance and maintain an effective and efficient complaint intake service to reduce or eliminate non-jurisdictional and frivolous complaints.

B. To provide the opportunity for the early resolution through mediation of every complaint filed.

C. On all cases not resolved by mediation, to conduct a prompt and thorough investigation of all allegations and to render a timely and appropriate determination that is supported by evidence of either probable cause or no probable cause in all cases submitted to Commissioners for such determination.

Program History

Kansas Statutes Annotated 44-1004 provides the Kansas Human Rights Commission with the power to investigate complaints of discrimination based on race, color, ancestry, religion, sex, national origin, genetic testing (employment only), and disability, in the areas of employment, housing, and public accommodations. Effective January 1, 1992, the Commission was authorized to also investigate complaints of housing discrimination based upon familial status. The Kansas Age Discrimination in Employment Act (KSA 44-1111, et seq.) authorizes the Commission to investigate age-based employment discrimination complaints.

In 1972, the Kansas Legislature gave the Commission the authority to process complaints alleging sex discrimination. In 1974, physical handicap was added, which had the effect of substantially expanding the Commission's coverage. In 1983, the Legislature passed the Kansas Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which gave the Commission the authority to process complaints of age discrimination in employment for persons between the ages of 40 to 70. At that time, the Federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act also covered persons from 40 to 70 years of age. However, in 1986, the Federal Law was changed in that the upper age limit of 70 was removed. In 1987, the Commission supported legislative efforts to make the same change in the Kansas law, i.e., to remove the upper age of 70. As a result of these efforts, the 1988 Kansas Legislature amended the age act to remove the age 70 limit. The amendments also changed the lower age coverage from 40 years to 18 years. Subsequently, House Bill 2771 of the 2008 Legislative Session changed the definition of age from the previous “18 or more years” to the current “40 or more years”. Effective May 24, 1984, the Legislature authorized the Commission to award damages for mental pain, suffering, and humiliation up to an amount of $2,000 where appropriate under the Kansas Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and in cases of employment or public accommodations discrimination under the Kansas Act Against Discrimination.

The 1991 Legislature made the most extensive and significant amendments to the Kansas Act Against Discrimination since the original enactment of the Kansas Act in 1953. The Kansas Act Against Discrimination was amended in an effort to make it similar to two federal laws, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988. Other amendments were also made to prohibit discrimination in membership practices of nonprofit, recreational or social associations, or corporations, on the basis of race, religion, sex, color, disability, national origin, or ancestry, if the organization has 100 or more members and provides regular meal service and receives payment for dues, and use of facilities. Religious or private fraternal and benevolent associations or corporations are excluded from this membership provision. These amendments also extended protection against discrimination to persons with a disability (prior law covered physical handicap) in the areas of employment, public accommodations, and housing, and to persons on the basis of familial status in the area of housing. Familial status is defined as having children less than 18 years of age domiciled with a parent or another person having legal custody of the children. The employment and public accommodations amendments were effective July 1, 1991, while the housing amendments became effective January 1, 1992.

In the 1992 Legislative session, further amendments were made to the housing discrimination section of the KAAD, which provided expanded damage and penalty awards when housing discrimination is proven. The 1995 Legislature amended the KAAD to require that complaints filed with the Kansas Human Rights Commission articulate in writing a statement of a prima facie case of discrimination pursuant to an established legal theory of discrimination. The Legislature also enacted statutory provisions authorizing the dismissal of complaints pending for more than 300 days under certain circumstances with a resulting right to assert the complaint in court action. The 1999 Legislature added restrictions on the use of genetic testing for pre-employment use.

Substitute for Senate Bill 77 of the 2005 Legislative Session became effective July 1, 2005, and prohibited law enforcement officers or agencies from relying, as the sole factor, on race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, or religious dress in selecting which individuals to subject to routine traffic stops, or in deciding upon the scope and substance of law enforcement activity following the initial routine traffic stop. Substitute for Senate Bill 77 was codified in KSA 22-4606 through KSA 22-4611. The law also provided that a representative from the Commission shall serve on a 15-member task force appointed by the governor. The governor's task force on racial profiling shall work in partnership with local and state law enforcement agencies to review current policies and make recommendations for future policies and procedures statewide for the full implementation of the provisions of KSA 2006 Supp. 22-4606 through 22-4611, and amendments thereto. The law mandated that the Commission receive, review, and investigate, if necessary, complaints of racial and other profiling. Subsequently, SB 93 of the 2011 Legislative Session transferred the filing and investigation, if necessary, of profiling complaints from the Kansas Human Rights Commission to the Office of the Attorney General. The law became effective upon its publication in the Kansas Register on May 26, 2011.

House Bill 2582 of the 2006 Legislative Session amended the Kansas Act Against Discrimination to prohibit discrimination in homeowners associations' restrictive covenants based on race, religion, color, sex, disability, familial status, national origin, and ancestry. If the homeowners association fails to delete prohibited language, the Commission may bring action against the homeowners association for injunctive relief. The 2012 Legislative Session amended the disability provisions of KSA 44-1002 and KSA 44-1006 to bring the Kansas Act Against Discrimination into alignment with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act.

In August 2020, the Commission Board voted to concur with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, which determined that Title VII's “sex” discrimination provisions prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and transgender status. Because State of Kansas court rulings hold that federal court rulings are persuasive on the interpretation of the Kansas Act Against Discrimination, the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Bostock is persuasive on the same prohibitions against “sex” discrimination by the Kansas Act Against Discrimination and “sex” is used uniformly in the Kansas Act Against Discrimination antidiscrimination provisions in employment, housing, and public accommodations. As such, the Kansas Human Rights Commission began accepting complaints of discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations based on “sex” inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The Kansas Act Against Discrimination has been declared equivalent to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 as amended, Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 as amended, and the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA). Because of this equivalency determination, the Commission can enter into contractual agreements with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which enforces comparable laws at the federal level.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Complaints Clearance Rate A, C 1.04 1 1.02 1.02 0.8 0.94 1
2. Case Processing Time (in months) - 8.29 9.31 9.73 9.28 10 10.59 10.59
3. Average SGF provided to Kansas Legal Services / Midland Mediation per case brokered through KLS / MM B, C 0 280 289 258 210 211 213
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Number of Complaints Closed C 943 952 814 920 830 920 950
5. Number of Complaints Filed A 911 951 799 900 1,032 975 950

_

Education


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Increased discrimination and increased harassment. Loss of a training tool for employers, individuals, stakeholders, and other groups who want to address discrimination and prevent discrimination.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 44-1004 (10) Mandatory No 2

Program Goals

A. Informs Kansans of what constitutes discrimination, the effects of unlawful discrimination, how to prevent discrimination, and provides an overview of discrimination laws. The public information program is the Commission's proactive effort to prevent future acts of discrimination.

B. To maintain a statewide education program to inform all citizens on what constitutes discrimination, the effects of unlawful discrimination, how to prevent discrimination, and how to obtain redress.

Program History

See Program History under the Compliance Program.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of People Completing KHRC Online Training A, B 9,891 11,010 12,347 12,375 9,510 10,000 10,100
2. Number of People Trained Through Educational Presentations A, B 794 595 613 630 1,569 1,600 1,625
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Number of educational presentations A, B 19 26 21 24 26 27 28
4. Provide online training A, B Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Office of the Attorney General

_

Administration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The office management functions of the Kansas Attorney General's office would not take place.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Kan. Const., Art. 1, § 1 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide timely and accurate information to the Legislature and the public on legal matters affecting the state, and to provide for the effective servicing of citizen advisory groups. Kan. Const., art. 1, § 1. Objective #1: To inform and educate the electronic and print news media about the Office of the Kansas Attorney General, the actions and activities of the Attorney General as they relate to matters of public interest, and laws of the State of Kansas.

B. To provide timely and accurate information to the Legislature and the public on legal matters affecting the state, and to provide for the effective servicing of citizen advisory groups. Kan. Const., art. 1, § 1. Objective #2: Discuss and prepare, in a timely manner, accurate information for testimony to or for meetings with the Kansas Legislature.

Program History

The Administration Division provides communications and day-to-day office management of the agency.

Performance Measures

Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percentage of fiscal note inquiries responded to in a timely manner B 98% 99% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
2. Number of brochures, documents, reports, media releases, videos, and other informational materials created or made available on the agency website. B 7,618 8,512 9,366 10,250 10,121 11,100 11,100
3. Number of fiscal note inquiries responded to in a timely manner B 63 99 53 75 193 125 125
4. Number of formal releases of opinions, news, information and the Attorney General's consumer protection advice A 298 252 241 250 244 250 250

_

Anti-Human Trafficking


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

There will be less capacity of criminal justice personnel statewide to respond effectively to human trafficking. There will be less coordination of training for law enforcement agencies throughout Kansas. Victim service agencies and allied professionals will not receive the necessary training for identification of human trafficking victims, and may not have the capacity to provide services to them. Less awareness of what human trafficking is and what it looks like in Kansas communities which could potentially lead to less reporting to law enforcement and a reduced number of victims recovered and criminals brought to justice. Loss of statewide coordination of policies to combat human trafficking that are mutually developed by state agencies, victim service groups and law enforcement.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-756; KSA 75-758 and KSA 74-7337; KSA 75-757, KSA 75-759 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To coordinate and enhance the efforts to stop the commercial exploitation of children and other forms of human trafficking in Kansas as per KSA 75- 756 to 759. Objective #1: To enhance the human trafficking reduction efforts in Kansas through policy analysis by the Human Trafficking Advisory Board as per KSA 75-757.

B. To coordinate and enhance the efforts to stop the commercial exploitation of children and other forms of human trafficking in Kansas as per KSA 75- 756 to 759. Objective #2: To increase the capacity of Kansas to reduce human trafficking through awareness efforts as per KSA 75-759.

C. To coordinate and enhance the efforts to stop the commercial exploitation of children and other forms of human trafficking in Kansas as per KSA 75- 756 to 759. Objective #3: To increase capacity of criminal justice personnel statewide to respond effectively to human trafficking as per KSA 75-756.

D. To coordinate and enhance the efforts to stop the commercial exploitation of children and other forms of human trafficking in Kansas as per KSA 75- 756 to 759. Objective # 4: To increase capacity of victim service agencies to respond effectively to human trafficking in Kansas as per KSA 75-758.

Program History

In 2010, The Attorney General's Office developed the Human Trafficking Advisory Board to improve the Kansas response to human trafficking, focusing on prevention, protection, prosecution, and partnership. This group worked to create awareness through training, and identified needs of the state to improve the response. In 2011, Anti-Human Trafficking Unit was developed in the Office of the Attorney General to provide the resources to coordinate and enhance the efforts to stop the commercial exploitation of children and other forms of human trafficking in Kansas as per K.S.A 75-756 to 75-759. The Unit continues to focus on providing education and training to professionals and the public on topics that promote a greater understanding of anti-trafficking practices.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of grants awarded D 6 6 5 5 5 7 8
2. Number of law enforcement officers trained C 520 574 455 400 312 400 500
3. Number of law enforcement trainings provided C 16 10 8 10 5 10 10
4. Number of presentations provided B 88 19 36 25 - - -
5. Number of public policy and prevention strategies recommended A 8 6 90 8 - - -
6. Number of victim service personnel trained D 1,356 401 964 1,000 433 1,000 1,000
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
7. Number of informational releases, annual reports, and training materials produced and disseminated A 17,134 12,134 20,034 20,000 - - -
8. Number of trainings provided F 31 16 28 25 23 25 30

_

Child Death Review Board


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Kansas State Child Death Review Board serves in the capacity as one of three Citizen Review Panels in the State. Each state is required by the Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) to establish citizen review panels in order to receive federal funding for child abuse prevention services.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 22a-241 through 22a-244 Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. Conduct a review of all child deaths in Kansas pursuant to KSA 22a-243 and amendments thereto. Objective #1: Impact decision making in Kansas by collecting, maintaining, and reporting on data pertaining to child deaths.

B. To provide guidance and information to advocacy groups, law enforcement agencies, and other related agencies in all 105 Kansas countiesregarding trends, risk factors, and patterns surrounding child death. KSA 22a-243(h) and amendments thereto. Objective #1: Serve on task forces and committees and attend meetings related to child death.

Program History

The State Child Death Review Board was created by K.S.A 22a-243 in 1992 and is charged with reviewing all deaths of children ages birth through 17 years' old who die within Kansas and Kansas residents in that age group who die outside the state. The board works to identify patterns, trends, and risk factors and to determine the circumstances surrounding child fatalities. The ultimate goal is to reduce the number of child fatalities in the state by informing policies and practices that can save lives.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of case disclosures made to any county or district attorney, law enforcement agency, or licensing body pursuant to KSA 22a-243 (j) A 9 2 4 4 11 5 5
2. Number of public policy recommendations and prevention strategies proposed B 17 17 20 15 No Longer Used. - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Informational releases, annual reports and training materials produced and disseminated by the Board B 4 5 4 4 No Longer Used. - -
4. Number of child death cases reviewed by the Board A 414 362 365 350 - - -
5. Number of individuals trained by SCDRB staff and/or members B 238 279 100 100 - - -
6. Public meetings and training seminars held or participated in concerning child deaths B 77 88 68 60 - - -

_

Civil Forfeiture


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the program were not funded, an income stream that funds expenditure allowed by the Federal Guide for Equitable Sharing for the OAG would be eliminated and and local entities that equitably share in the program would cease to receive their share of the funding as well.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 60-4109 et seq. Mandatory No 2

Program Goals

A. Through sharing agreements, receive revenues derived from federal forfeiture cases with a state nexus to improve Assistant Attorney General and Appellate Attorney competency, and to build capability to effectively and efficiently present cases to juries through the acquisition and use of quality equipment.

Objective #1: Support forfeiture actions against the proceeds and facilitating property of criminal activity.

Program History

The Equitable Sharing Program is a long-standing partnership with the US Attorney's and the OAG. The assigned AAG is embedded with the US Attorney's office in Wichita.

Performance Measures

Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Asset forfeiture amounts placed in the Kansas Attorney General's forfeiture fund* - 282,132 1,565 0 75,000 - - -
2. Number of forfeiture cases opened* - 0 7 8 10 - - -
*The previous forfeiture attorney was appointed as a District Judge in early January 2019. The position was not filled until December 2020. As a result, the number of new cases filed for FY 2020 was impacted.

_

Civil Litigation


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If the civil litigation division did not represent the state in these legal matters, outside counsel would have to retained in every legal matter. This would result in significant additional cost to the state. The division handles a large number of cases covering a wide range of legal issues.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-702, KSA 75-6108, 75-6116, 75-6117 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective #1: In the defense of the State and/or its agencies and employees, ensure that each and every action or threatened action is responded to in a timely manner.

B. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective #2: As to cases initiated by, retained or referred to the Civil Litigation Division for action at the trial court level, ensure that each and every action is a pursuit for justice.

C. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective #3: As to cases initiated by, retained, or referred to the Civil Litigation Division for action at the appellate court level, ensure that each and every action is a pursuit for justice.

D. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective #4: Prosecute violations of Kansas administrative law on behalf of Kansas licensing boards and agencies.

E. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective # 5: To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas in matters relating to the approval of trustee accountings for charitable trusts and protection of charitable assets and beneficiaries. Troutman v. DeBoissiere, 66 Kan. 1, 9, 71 Pac. 286 (1903); K.S.A 58a-110.

F. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective #6: With regard to bankruptcy litigation, the Civil Litigation Division gives legal advice and assistance to state agencies, including Regents Institutions, involved in bankruptcy litigation and protects against the discharge of student loans, fines, penalties, criminal restitution and other types of debts owed to state government.

G. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas, its agencies and employees, in civil matters contested before a Kansas or Federal court or administrative agency. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, -708 -713; KSA 75-6108 & -6117, and amendments thereto; and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated and the United States Code.

Objective #7: In matters involving Indian Tribes and the placement of tribal land into trust with the Federal government, the Civil Litigation Division reviews the tribes' applications and, where appropriate, objects to the application before the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the Department of Interior, and, where appropriate, Federal court.

H. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advice and technical assistance to the Attorney General and agency employees, as well as to any branch, department, agency, authority, institution or other instrumentality of the State of Kansas; other State legal counsel in the performance of their duties, as well as education to the public and profession. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, 704, -708, & -710; KSA 75-3111 and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated.

Objective #1: Respond in a timely manner to questions from State agencies, officials, and employees.

I. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advice and technical assistance to the Attorney General and agency employees, as well as to any branch, department, agency, authority, institution or other instrumentality of the State of Kansas; other State legal counsel in the performance of their duties, as well as education to the public and profession. Memorial Hospital Ass'n, Inc. v. Knutson, 239 Kan. 663, 667, 772 P.2d 1093 (1986); KSA 75-702, -703, 704, -708, & -710; KSA 75-3111 and numerous other statutes found within the Kansas Statutes Annotated.

Objective #2: Help educate the public and the profession about the role of the office and generally applicable legal issues.

J. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas in matters concerning 1) the enforcement of the Kansas Funeral and Cemetery Merchandise Agreements, Contracts and Plans Act, Cemetery Merchandise Contracts Act, and the Kansas Cemetery Corporations Act, as those Acts relate to the protection of cemetery trust funds required to be maintained by law; and 2) the investigation of abandoned cemeteries to determine the necessity of the dissolution of the cemetery corporation owning the abandoned cemetery.

Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate, and act on matters referred by the Kansas Secretary of State concerning the Kansas Funeral and Cemetery Merchandise Agreements, Contracts and Plans Act, Cemetery Merchandise Contracts Act, and the Kansas Cemetery Corporations Act as those Acts relate to the protection of cemetery trust funds required to be maintained by law, and to effectively, efficiently, and ethically prosecute actionable cases in a timely manner; and to investigate and take action on abandoned cemeteries.

Program History

The Civil Litigation Division is primarily responsible for providing for the defense of the State of Kansas and its agencies and employees in civil matters contested before Kansas or Federal courts and before administrative agencies. The Division is responsible for carrying out the Attorney General's administration of the Kansas Tort Claims Fund and for providing or arranging for the defense of civil actions or proceedings against covered persons and entities. The Division also acts as Litigation Counsel for numerous, smaller state agencies in disciplinary and licensure matters under the Kansas Administrative Procedures Act or the Kansas Judicial Review Act.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of Administrative Prosecution cases D 1,083 852 684 750 - - -
2. Number of applications for taking land into trust received and reviewed G 2 0 2 2 - - -
3. Number of bankruptcy cases monitored to protect the State's interest* F 45 70 25 40 - - -
4. Number of case files handled by the Civil Litigation Division A 2,506 2,066 2,067 2,100 - - -
5. Number of cases using outside contract counsel A 18 21 31 30 - - -
6. Number of new appellate cases opened involving appeals of Civil Litigation Division cases (Does not include continuing appellate cases) C 11 12 12 12 - - -
7. Number of new petitions for approval of Trustee motions and actions filed and reviewed E 14 15 15 15 - - -
8. Number of Requests for Involvement in Cemetery Cases received and handled J 0 1 2 1 - - -
*The economic conditions due to the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in a significant increase in bankruptcy filings, which has continued in FY 2021.
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
9. Number of complaints concerning charitable organizations or solicitations resolved or closed: - 16 33 21 - 26 35 35
10. Number of litigation files opened on new complaints: - 0 0 0 2 0 2 2
Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
11. Number of complaints filed concerning charitable organizations or solicitations: - 16 25 22 25 - 25 25
12. Percent of complaints filed concerning charitable organizations or solicitations complaints processed in a timely manner: - 95% 88% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99%

_

Consumer Protection: Antitrust


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Harm to the economy of the state and consumers due to unchecked anticompetitive conduct. Inability to adequately comply with the enforcement requirements of KSA 50-109 or adequately represent the interests of the state and its consumers. The Act concentrates enforcement power in the Attorney General, so without adequate funding to enforce these statutes, there would be little to no antitrust enforcement in the State of Kansas, absent a few individual actions for individual damages. Antitrust investigation and litigation tends to be a long term process—frequently spanning several years by the time investigation, litigation, settlement or judgment, and appeals are complete. If an Assistant Attorney General is not engaged and involved at each step of the process, the State could lose out on and forego recovery in the matter.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 50-101 through KSA 50-163, in particular KSA 50-103 and KSA 50-153 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of state and federal antitrust laws on antitrust matters referred to the office, ensure that each allegation is examined by an Assistant Attorney General, and that appropriate action is taken. KSA 50-101 to 50-1,105.

Program History

Kansas was the first state in the Union to enact a state-level antitrust law of general application when the first version was enacted in 1889, before the federal Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 was passed. The Kansas Restraint of Trade Act was first enacted in 1897. Antitrust was first reported as a complaint category by the Kansas Attorney General in the 1999 Annual Report of the Consumer Protection Division. There were 14 antitrust complaints filed that year. Major revisions to the Kansas Restraint of Trade Act were passed in both 2000 and 2013. In 2000, criminal antitrust enforcement was repealed, certain antiquated provisions were removed, and the Attorney General was given modern investigative powers, including administrative subpoena power. At that time, enforcement power for the Act was concentrated in the Office of the Attorney General, rather than in county and district attorneys' offices. To the extent the State of Kansas is involved in antitrust litigation, the Attorney General is the state's litigator. In 2013, the Act was further revised to clarify the law's application, and synchronize its application with federal antitrust laws.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percentage of citizen-filed antitrust complaints processed in a timely manner A 95% 100% 100% 99% - - -
2. Percentage of interstate antitrust case referrals from the federal government, or from another state's attorney general's office, processed in a timely manner A 100% 100% 100% 99% - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Number of cases in active litigation A 4 4 6 7 - - -
4. Number of complaints concerning antitrust resolved or closed A 5 6 2 2 - - -
5. Number of litigation files opened on new complaints E 1 0 0 1 - - -
6. Number of new complaints filed concerning antitrust A 8 4 2 3 - - -

_

Consumer Protection: Charitable Organizations


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act has no private remedy. Only the Attorney General or County and District Attorneys are authorized to enforce the Act. If the charitable work of the agency is not funded, consumer complaints and reports from volunteers, employees and others regarding fraudulent charitable solicitation practices will not be investigated or pursued.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 17-1759, et seq. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas in matters relating to the enforcement of the Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act, KSA 17-1767 & 1768. Objective #1: To receive, process, and publish annual registration applications of charitable organizations, professional fund raisers, and professional solicitors employed by charitable organizations in a timely manner.

B. To provide efficient, effective and ethical legal advocacy on behalf of the State of Kansas in matters relating to the enforcement of the Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act, KSA 17-1767 & 1768. Objective #2: To receive, process, investigate and act on consumer complaints pertaining to the Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act and effectively, efficiently, and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce the Act against charitable organizations or solicitors.

Program History

The Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act was passed in 1988. The Act governs the registration of charities and solicitation requirements and violations. In 2021, the Kansas Legislature amended the Act, adding registration of charitable organizations, fund raisers, and professional solicitors to the purview of the Kansas Attorney General. Now, both the registration of these entities and the enforcement of registration or solicitation violations are the responsibility of the Consumer Protection Division. Violations of the Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act may be prosecuted by the Attorney General, or a county or district attorney. The Attorney General has investigative subpoena authority, and is authorized to bring an action in civil court, or obtain a consent judgment, for violation of provisions of the Act.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of submitted charitable organization, professional fundraiser, and professional solicitor registrations to which staff reviewed and responded within 60 days: A, B - 100% 89% 99% - - -
2. Percent of complaints filed concerning charitable organizations or solicitations complaints processed in a timely manner: A, B 95% 88% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Number of charitable organizations applying annually for registration: A, B - 599 5,692 5,500 - - -
4. Number of charitable organizations successfully completing the application process: A, B - 1,298 5,382 5,300 - - -
5. Number of complaints concerning charitable organizations or solicitations resolved or closed: A, B 16 33 21 35 - - -
6. Number of complaints filed concerning charitable organizations or solicitations: A, B 16 25 22 25 - 25 25
7. Number of litigation files opened on new complaints: - 0 0 0 2 0 2 2
8. Number of professional fundraisers applying annually for registration: A, B - 100 258 400 - - -
9. Number of professional fundraisers successfully completing the application process: A, B - 93 258 400 - - -
10. Number of professional solicitors applying annually for registration: A, B - 242 300 350 - - -
11. Number of professional solicitors successfully completing the application process: A, B - 242 300 350 - - -

_

Consumer Protection: Roofing Registration


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

This Roofing Registration Unit was created pursuant to legislation authorizing the Attorney General to administer and implement the provisions of the KRRA. This program is funded by fees generated by the program (registration fees, judgments, etc.). Not funding the program would leave Kansas consumers without the information that they need to protect themselves from unscrupulous contractors.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 50-6,121 et seq Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Roofing Registration Act, KSA 50-6,121 et seq. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate, and publish annual roofing registration applications in a timely manner.

B. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Roofing Registration Act, KSA 50-6,121 et seq. Objective #2: To investigate and recommend for prosecution any violations of the Roofing Registration Act

Program History

The Kansas Roofing Registration Act (KRRA) went into effect July 1, 2013. The KRRA helps ensure Kansas consumers contract with reputable roofing contractors. Pursuant to KSA 50-6,138, the KRRA is a part of and supplemental to the KCPA, and any violation of the KRRA is deemed to be a deceptive or unconscionable act or practice under the KCPA.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of submitted roofing registrations which were reviewed and responded to within 60 days A 100% 99% 100% 99% - - -
2. Amount of penalties and fees recovered in enforcement actions deposited into the Roofing Civil Penalty Fund consistent with the related court order B $87,521 $79,035 $18,631 $90,000 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Number of complaints concerning roofing registration violations resolved or closed B 131 133 64 130 - - -
4. Number of complaints filed concerning a roofing registration violation B 145 106 86 130 - - -
5. Number of litigation files opened on new complaints E 1 0 0 1 - - -
6. Number of roofing companies applying annually for registration A 1,531 1,719 1,612 1,750 - - -
7. Number of roofing companies successfully completing the application process A 1,455 1,408 1,464 1,500 - - -

_

Consumer Protection: Scrap Metal Licensing Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

This program was created in order to register all scrap metal dealers, combat scrap metal theft, and provide law enforcement a resource to track scrap metal sales throughout the state.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 50-6,109 et seq. Mandatory No NA

Program Goals

A. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Act (SMTRA), KSA 50-6,109 et seq. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate, and publish annual scrap metal dealer registration applications in a timely manner.

B. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Act (SMTRA), KSA 50-6,109 et seq. Objective #2: To enforce the Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Act through suspension and revocation of registration certificates.

Program History

On July 1, 2015 the “Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Act” (the Act) became effective by adding and amending laws related to scrap metal dealer registration and scrap metal sales. Additionally, the law amended certain criminal provisions related to scrap metal theft. In 2015, the Attorney General had authority over the implementation, administration, and enforcement of the Act, including creating and operating a registration process, creating and maintaining a database of registered dealers and transactions, and investigating and prosecuting violations of the Act. The Act established the Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Fee Fund to be administered by the Attorney General, which would be credited with all fees, charges, or penalties collected by the Attorney General under the Act. Expenditures from the Fund are used for the administration of the duties, functions, and operating expenses incurred under the Act. In 2017, the Kansas State Legislature amended the law, delaying implementation of certain provisions of the Act. In 2018, that delay was extended until January 1, 2019. When the Act was initially adopted, it was incorrectly estimated that there were approximately 200 scrap metal dealers in the State of Kansas, indicating that the revenue generated would likely have been sufficient to operate the program. However, at the time the Act was suspended, only 75 scrap metal dealers had completed the registration process. This resulted in a significant underfunding of the program. Because the Kansas State Legislature did not appropriate funds for this program until a year following the initial adoption, there was a delay in the request for proposal (RFP) process to create the transactional database required by the law. At the time of the suspension of this program, bids were undergoing review as part of the RFP process. In 2019, the legislature transferred responsibilities for the law enforcement database to the Kansas Bureau of Investigation. Prior to the Act, this Division has no history of enforcement of scrap metal related offenses. The Division educates the public, law enforcement officials, members of the legal profession, and providers of goods and services regarding issues relating to the KCPA and other consumer statutes in order to reduce or prevent consumer fraud.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of submitted scrap metal registrations which were reviewed and responded to within 30 days A - 100% 99% 99% - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
2. Number of complaints filed or investigations conducted concerning a Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Act registration violation B 3 22 57 50 No Longer Used. - -
3. Number of complaints or investigation files concerning scrap metal theft reduction act violations resolved or closed B 3 14 40 50 No Longer Used. - -
4. Number of scrap metal dealers applying annually for registration A - 78 130 135 - - -

_

Consumer Protection


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

There would not be an entity authorized to enforce the Kansas Consumer Protection Act throughout the state, that work would be shifted to the County and District level. By not enforcing the act, businesses would be allowed to conduct business in deceptive and unconscionable ways without consequence, other than the private action of consumers. The less informed consumers are of common schemes and scams, the less equipped consumers will be to protect themselves from the financial and personal hardships that they might suffer as a result of falling victim to these fraud. The KCPA specifically provides penalties for fraud against vulnerable consumers, and much of the education and outreach of the Office of Attorney General is to that demographic, e.g. senior citizens.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 50-623 through KSA 50-643, in particular KSA 50-632 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Consumer Protection Act (KCPA) and other state and federal consumer protection laws. KSA 50-623 et seq. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate, and act on consumer complaints in a timely manner.

B. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Consumer Protection Act (KCPA) and other state and federal consumer protection laws. KSA 50-623 et seq. Objective #2: To effectively, efficiently, and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce the Kansas Consumer Protection Act against suppliers for violations of the Act.

C. To provide efficient and effective education of the public, law enforcement officials, legal profession, and providers of goods and services on issues related to the Kansas Consumer Protection Act in order to reduce or prevent the occurrence of consumer fraud. Objective #1: Prevent consumers from becoming victims of deceptive and unconscionable acts and practices by educating them and providing them with written educational materials.

D. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of the Kansas False Claims Act (KFCA). KSA 75-7501–7511. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate and act on complaints pertaining to the KFCA, and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce the matters falling within the parameters of the KFCA.

E. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of the Unauthorized Practice of Law statute, KSA 50-6,142. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate and act on complaints pertaining to the Unauthorized Practice of Law (UPL) statute and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce matters falling within the parameters of the UPL statute.

F. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Wayne Owen Act (KWOA), KSA 50-6,139 et seq. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate and act on complaints pertaining to KWOA, and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce the matters falling within the parameters the statute.

G. To provide efficient, effective and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Data Breach Statutes. KSA 50-7a01 et seq., and KSA 50-6,139b. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate and act on complaints pertaining to data breaches, and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce the matters falling within the parameters the statute.

H. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the Kansas No Call Act. Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate, and act on consumer no call complaints in a timely manner.

Program History

This Division is responsible for safeguarding the citizens of Kansas by educating consumers and businesses and providing efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of consumer protection laws, including the Kansas Consumer Protection Act, the Kansas Charitable Organizations and Solicitations Act, the Kansas False Claims Act, the Kansas Roofing Registration Act, the Kansas Wayne Owen Act, the Kansas No Call Act, the Scrap Metal Theft Reduction Act, the unauthorized practice of law statutes, consumer information data protection laws, and state and federal antitrust laws.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percent of requests for consumer educational outreach presentations granted C 100% 91% 100% 97% - - -
2. Amount of consumer savings returned directly to consumers, as a result of investigations in the form of refunds, debts or obligations canceled, and products delivered, repaired or replaced without litigation A $2,288,319 $2,077,333 $2,427,250 $2,000,000 - - -
3. Amount of penalties (which go into Court Cost Fund) and fees recovered in enforcement actions deposited into the Consumer Court Cost Fund as consistent with the related court order B $3,309,293 $1,543,752 $39,143 $1,000,000 - - -
4. Amount of penalties and fees recovered in enforcement actions deposited into the No Call Court Cost Fund as consistent with the related court order H $21,500 $15,000 $0 $20,000 - - -
5. Amount of penalties and fees recovered in enforcement actions deposited into the State General Fund as consistent with the related court order B $11,559 $77,432 $674,450 $50,000 - - -
6. Amount of recoveries resulting from investigations through Assurance of Voluntary Compliance Agreements - $25,000 $418,276 $1,474,234 $200,000 - - -
7. Percent of complaint files in which timely responses are filed, served or conveyed H 95% 93% 98% 99% - - -
8. Percent of filed complaints processed in a timely manner A 95% 98% 99% 99% - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
9. Complaint files opened A 2,817 3,856 3,099 3,500 - - -
10. Complaints filed concerning false claims D 2 2 2 3 - - -
11. Complaints resolved or closed A 2,626 4,032 3,138 3,500 - - -
12. Consumer educational outreach presentations made C 7 10 12 50 - - -
13. Litigation files opened on new complaints B 0 0 0 2 - - -
14. Number of complaints concerning data breaches resolved or closed G 9 15 23 30 - - -
15. Number of complaints concerning false claims resolved or closed D 1 5 2 5 - - -
16. Number of complaints concerning KWOA resolved or closed F 4 7 3 3 - - -
17. Number of complaints concerning no call violations resolved or closed H 385 466 245 500 - - -
18. Number of complaints concerning UPL resolved or closed E 5 15 12 12 - - -
19. Number of litigation files opened on data breach investigations G 0 0 1 2 - - -
20. Number of litigation files opened on KWOA investigations F 0 0 0 3 - - -
21. Number of litigation files opened on new complaints E 1 0 0 1 - - -
22. Number of litigation files opened on no call investigations H 0 2 0 3 - - -
23. Number of new complaints filed concerning data breaches G 13 18 20 20 - - -
24. Number of new complaints filed concerning KWOA F 6 17 0 5 - - -
25. Number of new complaints filed concerning no call violations H 356 364 248 250 - - -
26. Number of new complaints filed concerning UPL E 8 12 11 10 - - -

_

COVID-19 Relief Funds


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
NA NA NA NA

Program Goals

NA

Program History

NA

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. No measures identified. - - - - - - - -

_

Crime Victims Compensation


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Per 34 U.S.C 20102, Federal VOCA Compensation Grants are a match award based on expenditures for Crime Victims Compensation. If state expenditures decrease, the Federal VOCA Grant Award decreases. Payments would have to be prioritized and some victim expenses would go unpaid. Victims would not receive referrals for additional services.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 74-7302, 74-7304, 74-7305; KSA 74-7317; 74-7312; KSA 74-7333; KSA 75-773; 34 U.S.C. 20102 Mandatory Yes 1

Program Goals

A. To award just compensation to the victims of crime for economic loss arising from criminally injurious conduct. KSA 74-7302, et seq. Objective #1: The Executive Director will ensure that every claim is thoroughly investigated and that the monies awarded by the Board are properly distributed in a timely manner.

B. To obtain additional funds to satisfy victim's claims through the pursuit of subrogation rights, restitution, and fees from offenders. KSA 74-7312, -7317(c), KSA 75-5211, -5268(e), Atty. Gen. Op. 90-65 and K.A.R. 44-5-115(b). Objective #1: The Executive Director will ensure the Crime Victims Compensation Board receives funds to which it is entitled from subrogation rights, court ordered restitution and fees collected from offenders.

C. To assist in the education of the public to improve methods of providing compensation to victims of crime. KSA 74-7304 (I), (j) and amendments thereto. Objective #1: The Executive Director, with the aid of the staff, will inform public officers and employees, health care providers, judges, attorneys, law enforcement officers, victim advocates, other interested groups and the public of the crime victim compensation program.

D. To assist crime victims in connecting with resources beyond crime victims compensation. Objective #1: The Executive Director and the Division of Crime Victims Compensation staff will communicate with victims to help determine their needs and provide referrals outside of crime victim's compensation to assist victims in their recovery.

Program History

This Division is responsible for supporting the Crime Victims Compensation Board (CVCB) to ensure that just compensation is awarded to victims of crime for economic loss from criminal conduct and in obtaining funds to satisfy victims' claims through the pursuit of subrogation rights, restitution, and fees from offenders. As part of this responsibility, the Division seeks to educate public officers and employees, health care providers, judges, attorneys, law enforcement officers, victims' advocates, and others about the board and the division. Our goal is to serve more victims of crime with empathy and efficiency. The Kansas Crime Victims Compensation program was established by the Legislature in 1978 (K.S.A 74-7301 to 74-7337).

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percentage of claims processed in 75 days or less A 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95%
2. Percentage of referrals made by law enforcement C 23% 23% 17% 20% 20% 20% 20%
3. Percentage of referrals made by prosecutors C 9% 8% 21% 20% 25% 20% 20%
4. Percentage of referrals made by providers C 30% 31% 24% 30% 29% 30% 30%
5. Percentage of referrals made by victim advocates C 38% 38% 38% 30% 26% 30% 30%
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
6. Amount collected from inmates, probationers and parolees for restitution and from subrogation claims B $1,158,532 $1,171,757 $1,906,028 $1,900,000 $1,816,349 $1,850,000 $1,900,000
7. Claims compensation data: Amount Paid A $2,604,925 $2,577,073 $2,602,811 $3,500,000 $2,692,865 $3,000,000 $3,500,000
8. Claims compensation data: Number of Claims Paid A 790 743 715 800 710 800 900
9. Claims compensation data: Total Payments A 2,777 2,316 2,249 3,000 No Longer Used. - -
10. Claims Processing Data: % of Claims Approved A 86% 90% 90% 90% 82% 90% 90%
11. Claims Processing Data: Claims Approved A 704 813 703 850 793 850 900
12. Claims Processing Data: Claims Denied A 114 91 80 85 176 85 90
13. Claims Processing Data: New Claims - 1,298 1,598 1,425 1,650 1,727 1,650 1,700
14. Claims Processing Data: Pending Claims A 212 222 318 200 No Longer Used. - -
15. Number of educational presentations made D 6 15 16 15 - - -
16. Percentage of applicants referred to the Attorney General's Office Victims Assistance Program and/or others D 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
17. Percentage of applicants screened for additional services D 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Bail Enforcement Licensing Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The elimination of funding would result in an inability to process new applications and administer those already licensed, eliminate the ability to litigate challenged administrative actions and eliminate the ability to investigate and/or litigate complaints against licensees and those who are unlicensed in accordance with the Kansas Consumer Protection Act.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-e01 through 75-7e09; K.A.R. 16-15-1 through K.A.R. 16-15-4 Mandatory No 3

Program Goals

A. Provide licensing services and maintain accurate information on persons and agencies licensed as bail enforcement agents (or “bounty hunters”) in the State of Kansas. Maintain the licensing records in a manner that supports office use and public access. Objective #1: Strive to effectively and efficiently manage the BEALU.

Program History

The Bail Enforcement Agent Unit began under the Attorney General's Office in 2016. The Bail Enforcement Agent Licensing Act (BEALA), or “bounty hunter” licensing act. The BEALA was instituted to license BEAs (those that track down persons who have skipped court proceedings while on a bail bond – but also do not have the approval/licensure of a Court or the Kansas Insurance Department to issue bail bonds). This unit is responsible for processing new and renewal applications and monitoring compliance with license requirements.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Action taken on License A 0 2 1 0 - - -
2. Administrative hearings: Hearings Conducted A 0 0 0 0 - - -
3. Administrative hearings: Prehearing Resolution A 0 0 0 0 - - -
4. Application administrative challenges A 0 1 0 0 - - -
5. Application denials A 1 0 0 0 - - -
6. BEA renewal applications received A 5 9 7 10 - - -
7. Initial BEA applications received A 27 30 20 25 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
8. Complaint cases closed A 1 1 1 1 - - -
9. Complaint cases opened A 1 3 2 1 - - -

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Concealed Carry Licensing Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The elimination of funding would result in the inability to issue concealed carry licenses or answer questions for those already licensed. The reduction in funding would also eliminate the ability to renew licenses and would also prevent the revocation of licensees who are not in compliance with state law and that may be prohibited from possessing a firearm. The section would also be unable to defend administrative actions which would eliminate due process to applicants or licensees who were previously denied a license or had their license revoked. Additionally, concealed carry instructors would no longer be certified or regulated to provide firearms safety classes.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-7c01 et seq., K.A.R. 16-11-1 through K.A.R. 16-11-8 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Administer and regulate the issuance of concealed carry handgun licenses (CCHL) pursuant to the 2006 Kansas Personal and Family Protection Act (KSA 75-7c01 et seq.) (K.A.R. 16-11-1 through K.A. R. 16-11-8). The Act became effective July 1, 2006 and the first licenses were issued January 3, 2007. Per statute, licenses are charged at $132.50 with $100 going to the Office of the Attorney General and $32.50 to the sheriff of the county where the applicant resides to pay for fingerprinting and processing the initial application. A budget proviso reduced the application fee paid to the OAG to $79.50 for FY 2022. Currently, $47 of each initial application fee paid to the OAG is in turn paid to the KBI for conducting the state and national background checks. Licenses are valid for four years. Renewal licenses are charged at $25 (plus a $15 late fee- if renewing within 6 months after expiration) and deposited with the Office of the Attorney General. There is no fee paid to the sheriff's offices during the renewal process as the renewal applications are submitted directly to the Office of the Attorney General. A renewed license is also valid for four years. Objective #1: Receive license applications from the county sheriffs, conduct background checks on the applicants and either approve or deny requests for a license within the 90-day period allowed by the Act.

B. Administer and regulate the issuance of concealed carry handgun licenses (CCHL) pursuant to the 2006 Kansas Personal and Family Protection Act (KSA 75-7c01 et seq.) (K.A.R. 16-11-1 through K.A. R. 16-11-8). The Act became effective July 1, 2006 and the first licenses were issued January 3, 2007.

Per statute, licenses are charged at $132.50 with $100 going to the Office of the Attorney General and $32.50 to the sheriff of the county where the applicant resides to pay for fingerprinting and processing the initial application. A budget proviso reduced the application fee paid to the OAG to $79.50 for FY 2022. Currently, $47 of each initial application fee paid to the OAG is in turn paid to the KBI for conducting the state and national background checks. Licenses are valid for four years.

Renewal licenses are charged at $25 (plus a $15 late fee- if renewing within 6 months after expiration) and deposited with the Office of the Attorney General. There is no fee paid to the sheriff's offices during the renewal process as the renewal applications are submitted directly to the Office of the Attorney General. A renewed license is also valid for four years. Objective #5: Certify and regulate concealed carry handgun instructors authorized to conduct the required weapons and safety training class.

Program History

In 2006, the Personal and Family Protection Act was signed into law. The Act's passage marked the first time that licensed concealed carry of handguns was allowed in Kansas. As a result, the Attorney General was tasked with overseeing the licensing process; as a result, the Concealed Carry Licensing Unit (CCLU) was created. The CCLU is the centralized unit in Kansas which administers and enforces the licensing provisions of the Act. The CCLU section reviews original concealed carry of handgun applications and either approves or denies them, suspends or revokes licensees that come out of compliance with applicable statutes and reviews renewal applications for those that reapply and approves eligible applicants or denies those that are ineligible; The CCLU also monitors recognition of the Kansas licensees by other jurisdictions and assists with litigation involving denials, suspensions and revocations through administrative actions. In addition, the CCLU approves or denies applications to be a concealed carry handgun training instructor and monitors those instructors for continued compliance. The CCLU also provides instruction and education to various groups across the state.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of new licenses issued A 4,645 6,893 4,952 5,000 - - -
2. Number renewals issued - 12,630 14,532 18,361 20,000 - - -
3. Percentage of license applications fully processed within 90 days A 100% 100% 100% 100% - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
4. Instructor certifications withdrawn B 33 167 34 25 - - -
5. Instructor orientation classes held B 2 0 0 2 - - -

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Economic Crimes Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
NA NA NA NA

Program Goals

NA

Program History

NA

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of organized crime cases criminally litigated (new measure) - - - - - - 5 10

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Livestock Investigation/Brand Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

There would be no law enforcement entity to investigate livestock crimes with resources to conduct multi-jurisdictional investigations.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-3111, 47-416, 47-425 Discretionary No 2

Program Goals

A. The section supports the prosecution section through witness interviews, criminal history checks, and subpoena service. In addition, it provides training, assistance, and investigation support for other law enforcement-related investigations in accordance with the Kansas Attorney General's statutory and constitutional duties. The section also supports investigations conducted by the Livestock/Branding Unit within the section, and Special Agents of the section that are assigned to the Northeast Kansas Crimes Against Children initiative, as well as other investigative personnel within the Attorney General's Office.

B. To provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the Kansas Brand Law. KSA 47-414 et seq.

Objective #1: To receive, process, investigate and act on complaints pertaining to the Kansas Brand Law, and ethically prosecute or otherwise enforce the matters falling within the parameters of the Kansas Brand Law.

Program History

The Livestock Investigation/Brand Unit of the Criminal Litigation Division is a cooperative effort between the Attorney General of Kansas and the Kansas Secretary of Agriculture. The partnership provides the ability for sworn law enforcement officers employed by the State of Kansas to assist local law enforcement officers in rural and frontier Kansas counties in the investigation of criminal offenses associated with livestock, including investigations that are multi-jurisdictional in nature. The Unit, consisting of two Kansas certified law enforcement officers (Special Agents) commissioned by the Attorney General, was originally established in FY 2014, as a unit of the Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division. In FY 2016, the Unit was moved from the Consumer Protection Division to the Criminal Litigation Division, as a unit in the Investigation Section. Additional investigative resources and support for the unit is provided by the Special Agent in Charge, Investigation section.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of request for assistance B 42 45 45 45 41 45 45
2. Number of requests for assistance or investigations resolved or closed B 63 45 45 45 31 45 45
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Number of entities reached in public education and law enforcement training presentations B 4 0 8 8 23 10 10
4. Number of head of livestock recovered B 36 0 700 800 566 800 800

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Major Crimes


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
NA NA NA NA

Program Goals

NA

Program History

NA

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cases resolved by plea (new measure) - - - 21 - 16 15 20

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Private Detective Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The PDLU would be unable to pay the overhead and staffing costs associated with the administration of new licenses and certifications issued by the PDLU; the litigation of any challenged administrative action that is taken/proposed against an applicant or licensee within the reach of the PDLU. While discretionary in most instances, Licenses that are subject to suspension, revocation or other administrative process would not have those actions taken against them – resulting in persons being licensed by the State when the law may not allow them to hold such status; Applicant's inability to challenge a denial of a license/permit/certification; and persons remaining licensed by the State when the law may not allow them to hold such status. The PDLU would be unable to pay OAH administrative appeal costs, resulting in, at best, an in-house employee serving as an administrative hearing officer and pulling them away from their other necessary duties or a lack of any administrative actions being taken against problematic licensees because those funds cannot be covered. Licenses would expire with no advanced warning and no recourse; licensees would be unable to renew their licensures/certifications where the law generally requires an approval unless disqualified; licensees would be unable to challenge the lack of an approval or denial of their renewal application(s) for continued licensure/certification. The law generally requires an approval unless shown disqualified; Overall, applicants and licensees would generally be deprived of the due process that current Kansas statutes afford them.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-7b01 through 75-7b23; K.A.R. 16-1-7 through 16-6-3 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide licensing services and maintain accurate information on persons and agencies licensed as private detectives and agencies in the State of Kansas. Maintain the licensing records in a manner that supports office use and public access. Objective #1: Strive to effectively and efficiently manage the PDLU.

Program History

The agency provides licensing services and maintains accurate information on persons and agencies licensed as private detectives and agencies in the State of Kansas and maintains the licensing records in a manner that support office use and public access. This fund and the responsibilities were brought over from the Kansas Bureau of Investigation on July 1, 2012.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Certified firearms trainers A 11 12 10 10 - - -
2. Complaint cases resolved A 5 2 1 5 - - -
3. Number of licensed independent private detectives A 121 128 134 125 - - -
4. Number of private detective agencies A 124 110 99 110 - - -
5. Number of private detectives licensed through agencies A 284 250 238 250 - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
6. Complaint cases opened A 1 3 2 1 - - -
7. New applications processed A 78 77 85 70 - - -
8. Private detectives with firearm permits - 115 111 113 110 - - -
9. Renewal applications processed A 128 171 104 275 - - -

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutors


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

If this Federally funded grant position was eliminated, there would be a reduction in Federal transportation dollars received by KDOT. By the state having this position, it allows the state to qualify for additional Federal funding. Additionally, prosecutors and law enforcement would not have a statewide resource for information and training on the current best practices and potential legal issues they may face when detecting, arresting and prosecuting impaired drivers.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
General: Discretionary No 2

Program Goals

A. The Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor (TSRP) program is funded by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) through a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation. The TSRP provides training, education and technical support to prosecutors and law enforcement agencies throughout the state on traffic crimes and safety issues. While the TSRP's focus is on alcohol and drug impaired driving, the TSRP also serves as a resource in other areas of traffic safety including distracted driving, occupant restraint, and other highway safety issues. Objective #1: Provide support to local prosecutors to review and prosecute traffic safety crimes with an emphasis on DUI fatalities.

B. The Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor (TSRP) program is funded by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) through a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation. The TSRP provides training, education and technical support to prosecutors and law enforcement agencies throughout the state on traffic crimes and safety issues. While the TSRP's focus is on alcohol and drug impaired driving, the TSRP also serves as a resource in other areas of traffic safety including distracted driving, occupant restraint, and other highway safety issues. Objective #2: Produce or co-produce with one or more agencies or organizations, training events relating to detection and apprehension of impaired drivers for law enforcement or in conjunction with prosecutors.

C. The Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor (TSRP) program is funded by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) through a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation. The TSRP provides training, education and technical support to prosecutors and law enforcement agencies throughout the state on traffic crimes and safety issues. While the TSRP's focus is on alcohol and drug impaired driving, the TSRP also serves as a resource in other areas of traffic safety including distracted driving, occupant restraint, and other highway safety issues. Objective #3: Inform prosecuting attorneys and law enforcement officers of significant developments about the DUI and Implied Consent laws as well as other traffic safety related news including upcoming training opportunities.

Program History

The TSRP position orginated in 2008 as a partnership between the Shawnee County DAs office and the OAG. The position was formalized after a grant funding review by the OAG. The position provides expert review and analysis of current DUI law, practice and case study for prosecutors and other interested parties across the state.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of prosecutor trainings conducted B 1 18 13 12 9 14 10
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
2. Criminal cases accepted for prosecution A 3 0 2 2 No Longer Used. - -
3. Cumulative attendees at law enforcement trainings conducted B 52 130 432 450 604 500 550
4. Cumulative attendees at prosecutor trainings conducted B 20 294 269 225 196 175 200
5. Law Enforcement Officers Receiving Newsletter C 492 460 456 450 484 485 490
6. Law enforcement trainings conducted B 3 4 17 20 23 20 20
7. Newsletter Subscribers C 681 652 665 680 701 700 715
8. Prosecutors provided technical assistance A 67 143 192 175 252 220 220
9. Prosecutors Receiving Newsletter C 130 131 145 145 142 145 150
Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
10. Other Traffic Safety Professionals Receiving Newsletter C 29 27 37 40 No Longer Used. - -

_

Criminal Litigation Division: Victims Rights Unit


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
NA NA NA NA

Program Goals

NA

Program History

NA

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of case support (new measure) - - - - - - 90 145

_

Criminal Litigation Division


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Lack of funding will eliminate the ability of the Kansas Attorney General's Office to prosecute homicides and child sex crimes, which are often the most difficult and demanding cases, throughout Kansas. Any decrease in experienced prosecutorial capacity would most negatively impact counties with smaller populations and more limited resources. The lack of prosecution capacity in homicide and child sex crime cases would further impact the victims or their family members ability to achieve justice for those criminal acts in a timely manner. Lack of funding will decrease the ability for Kansas prosecutors and law enforcement to receive specialized training. This lack of training will further impact Kansas prosecutors' ability to effectively handle cases, particularly in jursidictions with a smaller population and more limited training resources. The overally impact of a decrease in funding would severely undermine public confidence in the criminal justice system.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Kan. Constitution, Article 1, § 1; KSA 22-2202(r), 75-702, 75-704, 75-708 and amendments thereto; State ex rel Stephan v. Reynolds, 234 Kan. 574, 673 P.2d 1188 (1984). Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Build and sustain a group of highly skilled prosecutors who can efficiently, effectively, and ethically prosecute persons charged with violations of Kansas criminal laws. Kan. Constitution, Article I, § 1; KSA 22-2202(17), KSA 75-108, KSA 75-702, KSA 75-708, and amendments thereto; State ex rel. Stephan v. Reynolds, 234 Kan. 574, 673 P.2d 1188 (1984). Objective #1: Utilizing well trained and resourced Assistant Attorneys General, prosecute the most difficult and demanding cases throughout Kansas.

B. Build and sustain a group of highly skilled prosecutors who can efficiently, effectively, and ethically prosecute persons charged with violations of Kansas criminal laws. Kan. Constitution, Article I, § 1; KSA 22-2202(17), KSA 75-108, KSA 75-702, KSA 75-708, and amendments thereto; State ex rel. Stephan v. Reynolds, 234 Kan. 574, 673 P.2d 1188 (1984). Objective #2: Build positive relationships with state and local law enforcement officers and officials to foster core competencies in the investigation and prosecution of homicides, child sex crimes, illegal drug manufacture and distribution crimes, and crimes involving public officials.

C. This section supports the prosecution section through witness interviews, criminal history checks, and subpoena service. In addition, it provides training, assistance, and investigation support for other law enforcement-related investigations in accordance with the Kansas Attorney General's statutory and constitutional duties. The section also supports investigations conducted by the Livestock/Branding Unit within the section, and Special Agents of the section that are assigned to the Northeast Kansas Crimes Against Children initiative, as well as other investigative personnel within the Attorney General's Office. Objective #1: Provide certified law enforcement capability within the Kansas Attorney General's Office.

D. This section supports the prosecution section through witness interviews, criminal history checks, and subpoena service. In addition, it provides training, assistance, and investigation support for other law enforcement-related investigations in accordance with the Kansas Attorney General's statutory and constitutional duties. The section also supports investigations conducted by the Livestock/Branding Unit within the section, and Special Agents of the section that are assigned to the Northeast Kansas Crimes Against Children initiative, as well as other investigative personnel within the Attorney General's Office. Objective #2: Provide certified law enforcement capability as an agency member of the Northeast Kansas Crimes Against Children initiative.

Program History

The Criminal Litigation Division maintains a group of highly skilled prosecutors who assist county and district attorneys in prosecuting the most difficult and demanding criminal cases throughout Kansas. The Division develops and facilitates an annual forum for county and district attorneys to discuss issues related to the prosecution of homicides and child sex crimes in Kansas. The Division hosts regional Attorney General Calls that provide an opportunity to present continuing legal education on emerging prosecution and appellate issues and provides special training to law enforcement officers and officials, victims' advocates, and court services personnel on major criminal issues. The Division is also responsible for the investigation and licensing of applicants for concealed carry, private detective, and bail enforcement agent permits.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Annual Focus Four Forum attendance B 0 0 0 30 No Longer Used. - -
2. OAG to entity training events conducted B 16 4 7 9 3 10 12
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
3. Assist other agency requests supported C 27 25 44 45 70 50 70
4. Constituent inquiries reviewed C 188 122 238 240 157 240 200
5. Criminal cases accepted from county and district attorney offices A 22 41 36 25 12 30 40
6. Jury trials conducted A 2 2 5 8 3 12 15
7. Other investigations initiated C 6 2 3 4 8 4 10
8. Prosecution assistance request supported C 20 27 48 50 31 50 50
9. Regional AG Call attendance B 60 0 65 35 28 40 50
10. Safety and security incidents investigated C 6 5 4 4 8 4 10
11. Task Force Investigations opened or supported by OAG Special Agents assigned to the Task Force D 25 29 44 45 64 45 50

_

Criminal Litigation Division (Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center)


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The risk to Kansas posed by these threats will be undetermined if Kansas is left to depend on increasingly insufficient federal efforts that are not focused on Kansas Security concerns. Adequate threat and risk analysis will not be performed by federal agencies in support of Kansas security efforts leaving the state unaware of threats, with an understanding of the veracity of perceived threats and with no intelligence support to develop defensive/mitigation strategies. Law enforcement and HLS entities in Kansas will be left without vetting and dissemination of national level threat reporting, and no capacity to support effective access to classified threat reporting by cleared leadership. Threats will go undetected by increasingly insufficient federal efforts that are increasingly overwhelmed and cannot build the local, state and infrastructure relationships necessary to identify local threat activity in Kansas. Threats will go undetected by increasingly insufficient federal efforts that are increasingly overwhelmed and excessively bureaucratic and simply not focused on Kansas Security concerns.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 48-3701 through 3710 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. The Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center Act (KSA 48-3701 et seq.) establishes the Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center as part of the Adjutant General's department. The attorney general is tasked with chairing and providing administrative support of the Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center Oversight Board as well as assigning an attorney to serve as privacy and civil liberties counsel to the Center and appointing a Deputy Director for law enforcement. Objective #1: To support the work of the Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center through providing appropriate oversight, legal counsel and liaison with the law enforcement community.

Program History

The Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center (KIFC) was established with legislative authority through the appropriations process and by executive action of the governor, the adjutant general and the attorney general. The KIFC put in place careful provisions to ensure the protection of civil liberties and has continued to work closely with appropriate federal agencies to break down silos and ensure that information related to threats to our homeland receives the appropriate analysis. The Kansas approach to operating its fusion center has been noticed nationally as a model that ensures effectiveness in intelligence sharing while ensuring that the focus remains on homeland security issues and protecting civil liberties.

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. No measures identified. - - - - - - - -

_

Fiscal


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The agency would need to rely on Department of Administration resources to accomplish these day-to-day tasks.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Kan. Const., Art. 1, § 1 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide skilled and comprehensive administrative support to the Office of the Kansas Attorney General. KSA 75-709, 75710, 75311175 -3717, 75-3729, 75-3736; 75-4701 et seq.; 75-5501 et seq.; and amendments thereto.

B. Prepare and present the annual budget and support it before the Division of Budget, Governor and Legislature. Monitor administration of the approved budget.

C. Provide timely, detailed, and accurate fiscal services in accordance with the budget plan.

D. Acquire necessary goods and services, including adequate office facilities and motor vehicles of appropriate quality and quantity, within established funding, in a timely manner and at competitive prices. Purchases are made in accordance with state purchasing guidelines and contracts.

Program History

Fiscal provides budgetary and financial support for the agency.

Performance Measures

Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of Programs and subprograms addressed in the strategic plan through goals, objectives, strategies, outcome and output measurements. A 47 48 50 51 50 51 51
2. Number of transactions processed B 10,948 10,089 10,929 11,000 10,586 10,750 10,750

_

Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division: Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

A return to the systemic landscape prior to the Kaufman case in which cases of abuse, neglect, and exploitation go undetected or are not investigated or prosecuted timely or at all. There will be no central resource to provide education to law enforcement and prosecution to effectively, consistently, and ethically investigate and litigate cases of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of adults. Also, the general public will have less opportunity to be provided information which will protect themselves or a loved one from being a victim of abuse, neglect, or exploitation.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-723 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Participate in the review, referral, investigation, prevention, and prosecution of abuse, neglect, and exploitation cases involving adults pursuant to KSA 75-723. Objective #1: Review and follow-up all law enforcement referrals and substantiated reports of abuse, neglect, and exploitation for adults.

B. Participate in the review, referral, investigation, prevention, and prosecution of abuse, neglect, and exploitation cases involving adults pursuant to KSA 75-723. Objective #2: Prevention through education of law enforcement and prosecutors.

C. To develop and maintain a coordinated response to prevent serious harm and deaths of vulnerable adults as per KSA 75-754 and amendments thereto. The Silver Alert tracking responsibilities were shifted from the Victim Service division to the Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation Unit of the Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division of the OAG starting in SFY 2021.

Program History

In July of 2016, KSA75-723 was amended to allow for the Attorney General to assist in the investigation and prosecution of cases involving abuse, neglect, or exploitation of adults. This required the ANE unit to be removed from the Victim Services Division. At that time, the Attorney General made a decision to create a new division entitled Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division. The purpose of doing this was not just to provide a home for the ANE unit, but also to fulfill a broader vision regarding the prosecution of cases involving a financial component. The intent of the Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division is to be a state wide resource assisting local authorities in investigating and prosecuting very difficult cases involving vulnerable adults. In addition to providing direct investigation and prosecution resources, the division also provides an educational resource to lawyers, law enforcement, and the general public.

The Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation (ANE) unit was established by statutory mandate in the summer of 2006, largely in response to the Kaufman case, which occurred in Newton, Kansas. Arlan and Linda Kaufman operated a mental health group home for adults. Complaints of abuse had been made by residents over a period of years; however, due to inadequacies in the State's system of reporting and investigation, the complaints went uninvestigated. The Disability Rights Center of Kansas eventually gained access to the home which then allowed for subsequent law enforcement investigation, which then led to arrest, prosecution, and conviction of the Kaufmans in U.S. District Court. During the criminal investigation and subsequent review, it became clear there had been systemic failures which led to the abuse going undetected. As a result, the legislature in 2006 created the Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation Unit pursuant to KSA 75-723.

The ANE unit created by statute in 2006, was required to review all cases involving a confirmed finding of abuse by a state agency. The statute applied to both children and adults. The Unit was also required to provide a report to the legislature every year detailing its activities. This resulted in the Unit reviewing about 1800 cases of substantiated abuse every year, with roughly 375 of those cases involving adults and the rest involving children. Available resources in the Attorney General's Office were simply not adequate to handle such a case load.

The Attorney General was faced with only two realistic options. First, was to add enough skilled staff to the Unit to properly review and follow up on all cases (child and adult) which are referred to the office. This was the General's preferred option. However, at an estimated annual increase of $400,000, the State's financial situation made this an inopportune time to request such expansion. The second option was to amend the ANE statute to focus our resources on adult cases by amending KSA 75-723.

In the spring of 2016, the legislature passed and the Governor signed SB 408, amending KSA 75-723. While retaining the ability to review cases of child abuse, neglect, and exploitation within the limits of available resources, the statue narrowed the focus of cases requiring mandatory review by our office. Under the amended statute state agencies are now only required to forward substantiated cases of adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation to our office. In addition, the amended statute provides a new requirement that state agencies concurrently notify our office when a case of suspected adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation is referred to law enforcement. This allows us to make timely contact with local law enforcement agencies to determine from the outset whether they desire assistance in what can be very difficult cases to investigate.

The amended statute also provides that the Attorney General's Office, can now assist in the investigation, prosecution, and prevention of cases involving abuse, neglect, and exploitation. This means the ANE unit is no longer just simply a monitoring or auditing unit. This change of focus to investigation and prosecution, meant it was no longer appropriate for the ANE unit to be located in Victim Services Division. As part of the Attorney General's focus on fraud and abuse cases, in July 2016, the ANE unit was moved to a newly created division named the “Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division”.

Performance Measures

Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Cases being criminally investigated A 40 34 47 40–50 40 50 50
2. Cases being criminally litigated A 19 15 16 45,278 15 18 18
3. Educational presentations made to the law enforcement, prosecutors, or the general public B 14 16 18 14–20 12 14-20 14-20
4. Law enforcement referrals by State agencies regarding abuse, neglect, and exploitation of adults requiring review and potential follow up A 5,201 4,694 5,815 5,500 6,246 6,100 6,200
5. Silver alerts C 34 32 34 32–36 31 32-36 32-36
6. Substantiated cases of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of adults forwarded to office by state agencies requiring review and potential follow up A 672 498 374 450 466 475 475

_

Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division: Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.)


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Officers around the State will fail to receive necessary training for D.A.R.E. and SRO certification. Without this program relationships and coordination between the D.A.R.E. program and schools across the state would be weakened which would risk the effectiveness of the D.A.R.E. program in Kansas.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-721, 75-721(b)(3) Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide training and resources for Kansas school-based police (SBP) to reduce victimization of youth and help ensure a safer environment for the youth of Kansas. KSA 75-721 and amendments thereto. Objective #1: Provide trainings needed for D.A.R.E. and School Resource Officer (SRO) certification in Kansas along with collaborating with schools, communities, and other organizations to provide for the expansion of school based policing (SBP) programs in Kansas.

Program History

The statewide Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program is housed within the Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division. The D.A.R.E. program was created in 1983 in Los Angeles. It was a partnership between the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles School District. The focus of the D.A.R.E. program is focused on drug abuse prevention as well as violence prevention. The curriculum has changed over the years to adapt to drug trends such as the rise of addiction to prescription medication and also crime trends such as school shootings or bullying. The way in which the D.A.R.E. program is taught has also changed, keeping up with research in curriculum and effective instruction techniques. In 1999, the Kansas legislature passed KSA 75-721 which required the Attorney General to appoint a statewide D.A.R.E. coordinator to assist local law enforcement agencies and schools in creation of local D.A.R.E. programs. The statewide coordinator is also required to provide training to local law enforcement in how to teach the D.A.R.E. curriculum. Finally, the statewide coordinator also must perform services and provide information as necessary to support the success of the D.A.R.E. program in Kansas.

Performance Measures

Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of educational programs participated in and outreach conducted A 13 17 8 15 - - -
2. Number of officers trained through the D.A.R.E. and school resource officer training programs A 173 38 89 90–110 - - -

_

Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division: Elder Abuse MDT


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

NA

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-782 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To facilitate the convening of an elder and dependent adult multidisciplinary team in each judicial district. The purpose of such teams is to coordinate investigations of elder and dependent adult abuse, as well as identifying opportunities with local jurisdictions to improve policies and procedures in the notification and response to abuse, neglect, and exploitation of elder and dependent adults. KSA 75-782 and amendments thereto.

Program History

In the spring of 2021, the legilature passed HB 2114 which in part became KSA 75-782. This bill was brought to the legislature by the Elder and Dependent Adult Abuse Prevention Council. The Council was formed in 2019 and one of its primary purposes was to research multidisciplinary teams, also known as MDTs, in the context of the investigation of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of elder and dependent adults. The purpose of the bill was to improve communication and coordination between multiple agencies which investigate cases of abuse, neglect, and exploitation. The statutes requires specific agencies such as the County or District Attorney, the Sheriff, Department of Children and Familes, Department of Aging and Disability Services, and State Long-term Care Ombudsman to participate. It also allows for additional members as needed by the particular team. The teams are to coordinate investigations of elder and dependent adult abuse within the judicial district and is also allowed to identify opportunities to improve policies and procedures in the notification and response to such cases.

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. No measures identified. - - - - - - - -

_

Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division: Prosecutions


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Local prosecutors will be required to prosecute cases without any assistance on complex cases requiring an enormous amount of time and resource commitment. This will return us to a time when these cases were not prosecuted by local law enforcement due to complexity, case load, and/or a lack of interest. There will be no central resource to to effectively, consistently, and ethically litigate complex financial cases. Victims may not recieve justice and defendants may escape being held accountable for their actions simply due to the type of crime they choose to commit.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Kan. Constitution, Article 1, § 1; KSA 22-2202(q), 75-702, 75-704, 75-708 and amendments thereto; State ex rel Stephan v. Reynolds, 234 Kan. 574, 673 P.2d 1188 (1984). Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. Provide efficient, effective, and ethical enforcement of the applicable criminal statutes pertaining to general white collar crimes, insurance fraud, securities fraud, and cases generated by the Kansas Department of Revenue. Kan. Constitution, Article I, § 1; KSA 22-2202(17), KSA 75-108, KSA 75-702, KSA 75-708, and amendments thereto; State ex rel. Stephan v. Reynolds, 234 Kan. 574, 673 P.2d 1188 (1984), KSA 40-113 and amendments thereto, KSA 17-12a508 and amendments thereto. Objective #1: Review and prosecute white collar crimes, insurance fraud, securities fraud, and cases generated by the Kansas Department of Revenue.

B. To investigate and prosecuted criminal offenses identified by 2022 SB 84 which identify offenses related to wagering, unauthorized gambling, and violations of the Kansas Expanded Lottery Act 2022 SB 84.

Program History

Pursuant to statute, the Attorney General's office has historically prosecuted criminal cases of all kinds around the state in coordination with local county and district attorneys. This function was traditionally conducted within the confines of the Criminal Litigation Division. In January of 2013, the Attorney General moved prosecution of white collar crimes to the Consumer Protection Division. By transferring criminal white collar cases to the Consumer Protection Division, these cases no longer had to compete with homicides and child sex cases for resources.

Prosecution of white collar crimes continued within the Consumer Protection Division until July 1, 2016. In July 2016, KSA75-723 was amended to allow for the Attorney General to assist in the investigation and prosecution of cases involving abuse, neglect, or exploitation of adults. This required the ANE unit to be removed from the Victim Services Division. At that time, the Attorney General made a decision to create a new division titled Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division. The purpose of doing this was not just to provide a home for the ANE unit, but also to fulfill a broader vision regarding the prosecution of cases involving a financial component. The intent of the Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division is to be a statewide resource assisting local authorities in investigating and prosecuting very difficult cases involving vulnerable adults. In addition to providing direct investigation and prosecution resources, the division also provides an educational resource to lawyers, law enforcement, and the general public.

In 2017, the Attorney General supported the passage of Senate Bill 23. This new legislation relocated existing prosecution resources from the Office of the Securities Commissioner and the Kansas Insurance Department to the Attorney General's Office. These resources are now located within the Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division. In March of 2018, the Attorney General's Office entered into agreement with the Kansas Department of Revenue (KDOR) to assist in the enforcement and prosecution of cases arising out of investigations conducted by their Office of Special Investigations. This process is coordinated with the appropriate county or district attorney. Through co-location, cross training, and integrated case management the State is able to gain efficiencies and allow stronger enforcement of the criminal statutes that prohibit financial crimes. In addition, the statewide Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program is housed within the Fraud and Abuse Litigation Division.

In the spring of 2022, the Kansas Legislature passed and the Governor signed into law, Senate Bill 84. This bill expanded gambling in Kansas to include sports wagering. In addition, the bill creates the White Collar Crime Fund, to be administered by the Governor. The bill allows for the attorney general, on or before August 1, to submit requests to the governor for the amount of money necessary to carry out the mission of the fund. The mission of the fund is to investigate and prosecute criminal cases related to illegal activity in wagering, unauthorized gambling, etc.

Performance Measures

Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. General white collar cases being criminally litigated A 79 75 86 70–93 84 72-98 72-98

_

Human Resources


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The agency would need to rely on Department of Administration resources to accomplish these day-to-day tasks.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Kan. Const., Art. 1, § 1 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide skilled and comprehensive administrative support to the Office of the Kansas Attorney General. KSA 75-709, 75710, 75311175 -3717, 75-3729, 75-3736; 75-4701 et seq.; 75-5501 et seq.; and amendments thereto. Objective #2: To ensure that the Office of the Kansas Attorney General is staffed with competent and qualified employees, to maintain a quality work environment for those employees and to ensure that federal and state employment laws are adhered to concerning the hiring, firing, discipline, and treatment of employees who work in the Office of the Kansas Attorney General.

Program History

Human Resources supports the staff of the agency.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Number of openings for which applications for employment are processed A 41 37 43 55 56 45 45

_

Information Technology


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The agency would need to rely on Department of Administration and Office of Information and Technology Services resources to accomplish these day-to-day tasks.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
Kan. Const., Art. 1, § 1 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To provide skilled and comprehensive administrative support to the Office of the Kansas Attorney General. KSA 75-709, 75710, 75311175 -3717, 75-3729, 75-3736; 75-4701 et seq.; 75-5501 et seq.; and amendments thereto.

Program History

The Information Technology Division provides information technology related support for the agency.

Performance Measures

Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. No measures identified. - - - - - - - -

_

Legal Opinions and Government Counsel Division: Bond Review


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

Bond review is required by state statute and demanded by the market before bonds and notes are registered and sold to protect the governmental entities, taxpayers and purchasers by ensuring compliance with state law. State real property may be improperly disposed of or used in an illegal or unauthorized manner. Municipalities may enter into agreements that do not comply with state law.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 10-108; KSA 75-750 Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To review for legality all proposed rules and regulations. To review the issuance of bond and temporary notes for legality and sufficiency of associated transcripts of proceedings. To review contracts affecting state property, including deeds, easements, leases and special assessments. To review interlocal agreements submitted by local units of government. KSA 77-420, 10-108, 12-3425, 75-3743, 74-3264, 75-2131, 122904 and others. Objective #1: Review any proposed adoption, amendment, or revocation of agency rules and regulations pursuant to KSA 77-420 to determine whether the proposed action is within the scope of the agency's authority and appears to be consistent with applicable statutory and constitutional law.

B. To review for legality all proposed rules and regulations. To review the issuance of bond and temporary notes for legality and sufficiency of associated transcripts of proceedings. To review contracts affecting state property, including deeds, easements, leases and special assessments. To review interlocal agreements submitted by local units of government. KSA 77-420, 10-108, 12-3425, 75-3743, 74-3264, 75-2131, 122904 and others. Objective #2: Perform an independent review of the legality of the issuance of bonds and notes by governmental entities and the sufficiency of the transcript of proceedings used by municipalities to issue bonds and temporary notes.

C. To review for legality all proposed rules and regulations. To review the issuance of bond and temporary notes for legality and sufficiency of associated transcripts of proceedings. To review contracts affecting state property, including deeds, easements, leases and special assessments. To review interlocal agreements submitted by local units of government. KSA 77-420, 10-108, 12-3425, 75-3743, 74-3264, 75-2131, 122904 and others. Objective #3: Review easements, special assessments, deeds and leases on state property as statutorily required for form and/or substance.

D. To review for legality all proposed rules and regulations. To review the issuance of bond and temporary notes for legality and sufficiency of associated transcripts of proceedings. To review contracts affecting state property, including deeds, easements, leases and special assessments. To review interlocal agreements submitted by local units of government. KSA 77-420, 10-108, 12-3425, 75-3743, 74-3264, 75-2131, 122904 and others. Objective #4: Review Interlocal Cooperation Act agreements as statutorily required for form and/or substance.

Program History

The attorney general is authorized to fix, charge and collect fees for review and examination of the transcripts of the proceedings of municipalities for the issuance of municipal bonds under KSA 10-108.

Performance Measures

Outcome Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
1. Percentage of proposed State agency regulations reviewed in a timely manner A 99% 99% 99% 99% - - -
Output Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
2. Number of bond/temporary note transcripts reviewed B 319 336 246 320 - - -
3. Number of interlocal agreements reviewed D 74 43 44 45 - - -
4. Number of Regulations reviewed A 632 701 645 750 - - -
Unspecified Measures Goal FY 2020
Actuals
FY 2021
Actuals
FY 2022
Actuals
FY 2023
Previous Est.
FY 2023
Actuals
FY 2024
Est.
FY 2025
Est.
5. Number of easements, special assessments, deeds and leases reviewed C 15 11 13 15 - - -

_

Legal Opinions and Government Counsel Division: Contract General Counsel


Consequences of Not Funding this Program

The counseled agencies may not be able to access legal counsel trained in state legal and regulatory affairs on an affordable basis. Not using or under-utilizing legal counsel could result in violation of state law, expense to the state to defend and/or settle lawsuits, a delay in handling licensing discipline matters, and harm to the agencies' interests as the result of unfavorable contracts. By representing a number of smaller agencies, the OAG provides the most efficient and cost effective legal reporesentation for the State. The OAG would not be able to comply with its duty with respect to these important statutorily created entitites.

Statutory Basis Mandatory/Discretionary MOE/Match Rqt. Priority Level
KSA 75-769; KSA 41-201 (Alcohol Beverage Control); 74-8715 (Lottery); 75-1515 (State FIre Marshal); and generally pursuant to 75-702 and 75-710; 77-423 (State Rules and Regulations Board); 75-4101 (Surety Bonds and Insurance); 46-2303 (Joint Committee on State/Tribal Relations); and as designated by the Attorney General pursuant to 75-710; 66-106 (Corporation Commission); 74-4206 (Real Estate Commission);74-7029; 74-8809; and 74-4908. Mandatory No 1

Program Goals

A. To serve as general counsel for state boards and commissions that have no in-house counsel, helping them to pursue a proper course of conduct and avoid litigation through the provision of advice and consultation. Pursuant to KSA 75-769, the Office of the Attorney General has authority to charge legal representation charges to state agencies. To serve as the Attorney General's designee on certain statutorily created entities. KSA 77-423, 75-4101, 46-2303, 75-710, 66-106, 74-4206, 74-4908, 74-7029, 41-201, 75-1515, 75-1516, 74-8715, 77-8809. Objective #1: As general counsel for 29 boards and commissions that have no in-house counsel, attend administrative board meetings and hearings, draft orders, and assist with other legal matters as necessary.

B. To serve as general counsel for state boards and commissions that have no in-house counsel, helping them to pursue a proper course of conduct and avoid litigation through the provision of advice and consultation. Pursuant to KSA 75-769, the Office of the Attorney General has authority to charge legal representation charges to state agencies. To serve as the Attorney General's designee on certain statutorily created entities. KSA 77-423, 75-4101, 46-2303, 75-710, 66-106, 74-4206, 74-4908, 74-7029, 41-201, 75-1515, 75-1516, 74-8715, 77-8809. Objective #2: Serve as the Attorney General's designee on statutorily created entities such as the State Rules and Regulations Board, State Records Board, Committee on Surety Bonds and Insurance, and the Joint Committee on State/Tribal Relations or as directed.

Program History

Effective June 1, 2017, S.B. 149, sec. 2(a) (Now codified in KSA 75-769) established that, “The attorney general may determine, fix and establish a sys